A for Auto, M for Marathi: Jittery auto drivers in Mumbai turn to Std V Marathi textbooks

Auto drivers have been brushing up their Marathi skills for a week-long oral test drive at the Wadala RTO after state government made it compulsory for permit-seeking auto drivers to have basic knowledge of Marathi

“Nadi chya kathawar ek naav hoti” (there was a boat near the river bank) reads a nervous Anil Kumar from the colourful pages of a Std V Marathi textbook, as a stern-looking traffic officer peers at him. Kumar, who hails from a village near Kanpur, has been living in Mumbai for more than 20 years, and claims that he can speak better Marathi than most auto drivers. “I can speak and read Marathi well, and my children go to Marathi medium schools. But this test is completely unnecessary. How does language matter, if we take commuters where they want to go?” asked Kumar.

Also Read: Want to drive an auto in Mumbai? Learn to read Marathi first

An auto driver reads out from Marathi textbook for the test. Pics/ Datta Kumbhar
An auto driver reads out from Marathi textbook for the test. Pics/ Datta Kumbhar

For the last four days, auto drivers have been brushing up their Marathi skills for a week-long oral test drive at the Wadala Regional Transport Office (RTO), after the state government made it compulsory for permit-seeking auto drivers to have basic knowledge of Marathi.

Auto drivers await their turn for the Marathi proficiency test at the Wadala RTO on Tuesday Auto drivers await their turn for the Marathi proficiency test at the Wadala RTO on Tuesday 

Every morning since February 27, over 500 auto drivers line up at the RTOs, and anxiously wait for their ‘roll numbers’ to be called out. The ‘students’ are then ushered into rooms, where RTO officials and a Marathi language expert quiz them.

Read Story: Most auto permits went to non-Marathi people last year: Maharashtra CM

Anxious auto drivers revise their Marathi just before the exam
Anxious auto drivers revise their Marathi just before the exam

“If I want to go to Borivali National Park from Andheri, how will you take me?” asks Prashant Londhe, one of the RTO officials testing the drivers, before asking them to read out excerpts from the textbook.

The successful candidates are asked to deposit the permit fee through a demand draft, after verifying their documents.

“The test is not just about speaking Marathi, but also testing their knowledge of routes and the way they speak to commuters,” said Londhe.

To every other auto driver, the officials asked questions like, ‘what is left and right in Marathi? What are the tourist spots in Mumbai? How do you address women commuters?

The passing criteria, however is not too stringent, and on an average, about 70% drivers pass the test, we are told.

Also Read: Shiv Sena defends Marathi mandatory clause for auto drivers

This leniency worked in Mohammed Nasir’s favour. A 45-year-old auto driver, Nasir, who came in for the test on Tuesday looked visibly nervous. After sputtering a few answers in broken Marathi, he pleaded with the officials to not test his reading skills, and they relented.

“Drivers who have studied till Std VIII are asked to read from the textbook. Others who are not literate but manage to speak basic Marathi are granted permits. This is not some board exam, right?” said Vijay Bhoye, assistant RTO.

However, Bhoye admits that the test has put many people off, not to mention the Rs 16,000 fee for the permit.

“Only 50 or 60% of the people chosen for permits have turned up. Some people are upset with this new rule, but what can we do? It’s a state government directive. The fees for the permits have also been hiked, keeping many people away,” he said.

The auto drivers who pass the test may not get degrees or toss their hats in the air, they just drive away in their rickshaws, with a smile.

Commuters speak
City commuters are unimpressed with the Marathi test rule. They say, instead of forcing auto drivers to learn Marathi, the government should address problems like the fare refusals by auto drivers

Avril Serrao, Andheri resident
Such new rules make no sense. Even if auto drivers converse in Marathi, not everyone travelling by it may know to speak in Marathi. Earlier, there was a weird rule that shops should have hoardings in Marathi. Forcing someone to communicate in a certain way doesn’t make the state better in any way.

Claresta Fernandes, Andheri resident
Normally everyone speaks to the rickshaw drivers in Hindi. This Marathi business makes no sense. It seems like a political ploy. Youngsters struggle to speak Hindi well, let alone Marathi. I have seen rickshaw drivers communicating in English too. This state language is a crazy idea.

Deven Arora, Kandivali resident
Learning Marathi or speaking it has no real use in their profession. It is all about driving a rickshaw. The skill perhaps that the RTO should stress they have is better etiquette. Many rickshaw drivers refuse fares and are outright mean. This would help commuters more than their knowledge of Marathi.

Shruti Limaye, Mahakali resident
As long as the rickshaw driver knows his job, I am fine with it. Rather than Marathi they should make it mandatory that they take commuters to their destinations. Even though they now know Marathi after passing the RTO test, I am not sure how often I will talk to them in the language.

— As told to Maleeva Rebello

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