ABVP office in Mumbai vandalised; party worker injured

Two days after the members of Congress student wing, National Students Union of India (NSUI) allegedly vandalised an ABVP office in Bengaluru and assaulted the office bearers, another attack unrolled in Matunga on Saturday.

Officials confirmed that a total of six attackers vandalised their central office completely and broke the glass windows of the office leaving one of the party members injured. Local ABVP officials have not only condemned the attack and demanded an enquiry on the repeated attacks on the party offices; they are calling the action a cheap technique of the NSUI to gain mileage against the backdrop of the alleged suicide of Dalit research scholar Rohith Vemula at Hyderabad University.

The incident took place on Saturday evening when four of the party workers were inside the office, which was vandalised by six hooligans. Konkan State Organising Secretary of ABVP, Yadunath Deshpande said that while the attackers didn't reveal their identity or intentions, on the backdrop of the previous attack it is a cheap political stunt of NSUI members.

"The party which has completely disappeared in the nation is trying to get mileage by attacking ABVP offices. Our party has been striving towards social harmony since 1948 and this is not a way to communicate. If there is an issue, we can sit and discuss it," said Deshpande.

While 21-year-old Francis D'souza, a party worker from Dadar unit of the party sustained injuries on his forehead during the incident, allegedly after the glass broke and parts of it left him injured, he was rushed to LTMG Hospital, Sion for treatment.

The party workers were registering an FIR against unknown assaliants at Shivaji Park Police station regarding the incident; none of the accused have been arrested yet. ABVP members have demanded an enquiry after the repeated attacks and requested the state and central governments to take action against the culprits. "We will take decisive steps if the culprits are not nabbed and attacks aren't stopped," added Deshpande.

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