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Appearing for SSC exams from ambulance, Mumbai boy scores 79.2%

16-year-old Dhyey Amlani is one of many who braved fierce odds to give the SSC exams; while some have shined, some are still awaiting results

While lakhs of SSC students across the city were appearing for their board exams on benches at an assigned school, Kandivli resident Dhyey Amlani (16) was appearing for his in an ambulance.

Dhyey Amlani was diagnosed  with Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis a sudden inflammation of the pancreas a month before his board exams

Diagnosed with Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis a sudden inflammation of the pancreas a month before his board exams, Dhyey was finally discharged from the hospital just two days before his board exams were slated to begin.

“Even though he was unwell, he insisted on appearing for his exams without the help of a writer. We applied to the divisional state board and his exam centre and, within a day, Dhyey was allowed to give his papers from an ambulance,” said Rupal Amlani, his mother.

Dhyey was shifted to a nursing home in Kandivli and, on every exam day, he was wheeled into an ambulance, which was then stationed at the Mary Immaculate School campus in Borivli, his exam centre. “On the day of his History exam, he collapsed, but still gave his paper,” said Rupal.

The Amlanis’ joy knew no bounds when the results were announced on Tuesday afternoon and they realised Dhyey had scored 79.2%. “It’s his determination that has resulted in this success and we are very happy and proud,” said Rupal. Dhyey, who has now recovered, is planning take up the Commerce stream in a city college.

Never too old
Many parents are celebrating their kids’ success after the announcement of the SSC results but Jayashree Kanam (41) from Andheri is anxious. After her daughters encouraged her, Jayashree had decided to appear for the SSC results along with her younger daughter, Shweta, this year.

While Andheri-resident Jayashree Kanam has failed in one subject, her daughter Shweta’s result has been withheld
While Andheri-resident Jayashree Kanam has failed in one subject, her daughter Shweta’s result has been withheld

They were both hoping to pass the exams with flying colours. However, while Jayashree has failed in one subject, a goof-up on the part of the state board has resulted in Shweta’s result being withheld. “I was hopeful that both Shweta and I would be celebrating after the results. While I have failed in one subject, I’m more worried that my daughter’s result is not showing on the website,” said Jayashree, who works as a helper at an anganwadi school in Andheri.

Jayashree, a single mother, had lost her husband in the 2005 Mumbai cloudburst. A car mechanic, his death forced Jayashree to start working as a cook in nearby houses. Soon, she took up work at the anganwadi in order to support the education of her two daughters. She had appeared for the SSC exam also to ensure that she could get promoted at work and be able to earn a salary of Rs 5,000 a month.

“It’s okay if I haven’t passed this time. I will try harder next time and ensure that I pass. As of now, my only concern is that my daughter should get her results in time to be able to apply for junior college admissions,” added Jayashree. Her older daughter, Sheetal, is pursuing her second-year B.Com while Shweta is hoping to be able to apply to a college of her choice.

Will trumps all
Polio affected their legs, but it couldn’t affect their determination to study. Two bravehearts from Mulund, Jay Thakkar and Viren Rupani, have managed to pass their SSC exams in the face of adversity and plan to study further as well.

Mulund resident Jay Thakkar didn’t let polio stop him from scoring 46% in his SSC exams
Mulund resident Jay Thakkar didn’t let polio stop him from scoring 46% in his SSC exams

Jay, who scored 46%, says, “My teachers at school were very supportive and never discriminated. My parents, who were my greatest strength, had appointed a home tutor, who helped me in every way possible. I am thankful to each and every one of them.”

Viren, who scored 48% marks, dedicated his achievement to his family. “My mother, who is a doctor, takes time out of her busy schedule and helps me. My sister is also a great source of support,” said Viren, who wants to pursue further studies in the Commerce stream.

Correcting wrongs
Earlier this year, a 15-yr-old class X student of a south Mumbai ICSE school was asked to withdraw admission from the school because she was a slow learner and appear for the Class X exams as a private candidate under the Maharashtra state board instead.

However, the timing was such that she was not eligible to appear for the SSC exams as a private candidate and was left with no way to appear for her class X exams. “Since her last day at school was August 22, we could not accept her form for state board exams. According to our rules, a student has to be out of school from July in order to be eligible to appear for exams as a private candidate,” said a senior state board official.

The student’s mother, however, dragged the authorities of the ICSE school to the Maharashtra State Commission for Protection of Child Rights. The commission reprimanded the school and requested the state board to consider the case and let the student appear for her class X exams as an SSC private candidate.

While she was finally able to give the exam this year, her results have been ‘reserved’ by the board. “My daughter worked very hard to give the exam and was very excited but now we don’t know what to do. I hope she doesn’t lose a year,” said her mother.

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