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Back on track: BSPCA to reopen its surgical ward in July

FDA to help the animal hospital to replenish depleted stock of drugs, which had resulted in closure of its surgical ward

After months of non-availability of drugs at the Bombay Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (BSPCA) hospital, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has extended its support to resolve the issue. Thanks to the FDA’s intervention, the BSPCA would be reopening its surgical ward from July.

Sunday mid-day report on May 4, informing about the closure of the BSPCA’s surgical ward due to unavailability of crucial drugs
Sunday mid-day report on May 4, informing about the closure of the BSPCA’s surgical ward due to unavailability of crucial drugs

The hospital was running short on drugs like phenobarbitone, ketamine and diazepam, forcing it to shut its surgical ward. On an average, the facility conducts 10 surgeries and treats 20 to 25 animals per day. Ever since the OT was shut by March-end, 150 surgeries have been kept on hold.

Confirming that the facility would be receiving support from the FDA, Lt Col (Dr) J C Khanna, BSPCA secretary said, “The FDA gave us a good response and told a Nashik-based pharma company to replenish our stock. We will maintain records of the how much drugs are being used and on which animals.”

It should be noted that the three drugs, especially ketamine, is a schedule X drug for which a schedule X licence is a must. Meanwhile, surgeries were being performed using propofol, a substitute of ketamine. But the hospital staff said it did not give desired results. Also, the drug put the life of the animal at risk.

FDA speaks
Commenting on the issue, Sanjay Kale, joint MD (Vigilance) of FDA, said, “A meeting will take place with the manufacturer following which an appropriate decision will be taken, and the drugs will be supplied to the BSPCA as and when required.”

Did you know?
>> Phenobarbitone is an anticonvulsant used to treat seizures and epilepsy in dogs and cats 
>> Diazepam is used as a sedative on dogs and cats
>> In veterinary science, Ketamine is popularly used as a general anaesthesia for operating on small animals like cats, dogs and rabbits. It is usually given intramuscular. In some cases, it is also used as a restraint in cats

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