BMC to go online to keep an eye on contractors and repairs

After much delay, the corporation’s real-time tracking and monitoring system is finally set to go online, enabling BMC officials to keep a watch on contractors and ensure quality control in their work

Constantly on the receiving end of criticism over the shoddy maintenance and construction work across the city, the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) now hopes to improve its performance armed with a new secret weapon live project monitoring. Originally expected to be launched in February, the civic body’s new tech savvy system is expected to finally go online this month, possibly as early as next week.

If a road roller is sent to repair potholes on, say, Aarey Colony road, then BMC officials should be able to track its journey and location at all times, using the live monitoring system. File pic for representation
If a road roller is sent to repair potholes on, say, Aarey Colony road, then BMC officials should be able to track its journey and location at all times, using the live monitoring system. File pic for representation

With the new technology, BMC engineers and officials will soon be able to monitor all road repairs, maintenance and construction work across the city in real time, from the comfort of their office. Although the project was proposed two years ago, it ran into problems early on, preventing its launch earlier this year.

“There was a problem while connecting the contractors’ vehicles and machinery to the system, since some parts had to be imported and then we had to familiarise ourselves with the system. Now, the software company has started monitoring roadwork, and all the data will be fed into the system, and we will soon be able to check information on it,” said Chief Engineer (Road department), Ashok Pawar.

The concept
The system, which will cost the corporation R9 crore a year (including operation and maintenance costs), will help the BMC keep track of the various contractors who carry out its projects, and ensure quality control. The software uses geographic information system (GIS) to track the real-time movement of all vehicles carrying materials for roadwork, as well as keep track of the machinery involved in the projects.

This technology is currently being used by the Pimpri-Chinchwad Municipal Corporation (PCMC) as well. The BMC has included a compulsory clause in all its contracts that requires contractors to install tracking chips. This means, if a road roller is sent to repair potholes on, say, Aarey Colony road, then BMC officials should be able to track its journey and location at all times.

The software was developed by Probity Software Private Limited, which had also developed the ‘Voice of Citizen’ website on which photos of potholes in the city can be uploaded.

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1 Comments

  • shahid18-Jan-2015

    please let me know why no body is not taking responsible to construct the road of aarey milk colony please i request you to construct the road well

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