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Bosnia marks centenary of Sarajevo assassination

The 1914 incident where Archduke Franz Ferdinand was killed by Serb revolutionary Gavrilo Princip triggered World War I

Bosnia: A range of cultural events to mark the centenary of the killing of Archduke Franz Ferdinand by Bosnian Serb revolutionary Gavrilo Princip on June 28, 1914, were held in Bosnia yesterday. Meanwhile, Serb politicians held parallel commorations.

Bosnian-Serb Gavrilo Princip in his prison cell after his arrest.
Bosnian-Serb Gavrilo Princip in his prison cell after his arrest. AFP/HISTORICAL ARCHIVES OF SARAJEVO

The central event in Sarajevo was a concert by the Vienna Philharmonic in the recently re-opened Vijecnica, the historic City Hall, which was recently refurbished after being shelled in the 1990s war.

A picture acquired from the historical archives of Sarajevo shows Archduke Franz Ferdinand exiting a train upon his arrival in Ilidza, western suburb of Sarajevo, on June 27, 1914, the day before his assassination.  AFP PHOTO/HISTORICAL ARCHIVES OF SARAJEVO
A picture acquired from the historical archives of Sarajevo shows Archduke Franz Ferdinand exiting a train upon his arrival in Ilidza, western suburb of Sarajevo, on June 27, 1914, the day before his assassination.  AFP  PHOTO/HISTORICAL ARCHIVES OF SARAJEVO

Among several exhibitions in the Bosnian capital to mark the centenary, one of the displays, ‘Assassination in Sarajevo’, were shown for the day in front of the main cathedral in the city’s central pedestrian area, featuring photographs that document Franz Ferdinand and his wife Sophie’s visit to the city on the day that they were murdered.

Tourists
Tourists dressed in period costumes pose at the street corner where Gavrilo Princip assassinated Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife Sofia. Pic/AFP

Bosnian Serb political leaders unveiled a new statue of Gavrilo Princip, in the city of East Sarajevo. The new life-size statue of Princip stands in the centre of East Sarajevo, a city in Bosnia’s Serb-led entity Republika Srpska, adjacent to the capital.
Meanwhile in Andricgrad, Serb political leaders unveiled a mosaic celebrating Princip.

While many Serbs see Princip as a hero, many Croats consider him a terrorist, and schools in former Yugoslav countries teach different histories about the causes of the 1914-18 war, reflecting more recent conflicts in the region.

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