Broad should be banned, says Michael Holding

Broad, had made 37, with England then 297 for seven in their second innings on Friday's third day at Trent Bridge, when he edged teenage debutant spinner Ashton Agar.

Stuart Broad and (inset) Michael Holding
England’s Stuart Broad acknowledges the crowd after his 65 in the second innings of the first Ashes Test on Friday (inset) Michael Holding. Pic/Getty Images

The ball clipped wicketkeeper Brad Haddin’s gloves and then flew to Australia captain Michael Clarke at first slip. Australia appealed for the catch but leading Pakistani umpire Aleem Dar ruled in the batsman’s favour as Broad stayed put on his Nottinghamshire home ground.

The tourists couldn’t believe the verdict but ultimately, as they’d already used up both their two permitted reviews in the innings, they were unable to challenge it by calling on the third umpire and had to accept Dar’s decision. ¬†Broad finished on 47 not out, having so far added 108 with Ian Bell (95 not out), and helped Ashes-holders England to a lead of 261 with four wickets left.

Holding said the International Cricket Council (ICC) should view Broad’s decision not to walk — the practice whereby batsman give themselves out without waiting for the umpire’s decision — in the same light as when West Indies wicketkeeper Denesh Ramdin falsely claimed a catch against Pakistan in a Champions Trophy match at The Oval in London last month. Ramdin was banned for two one-day games by the match referee, who happened to be Broad’s father, Chris.

“What Stuart Broad did amounts to the same thing as Ramdin,” Holding told the Daily Mail. “He knew he had hit the ball. The ICC fined Ramdin and suspended him for ‘actions that were contrary to the spirit of the game’. What Stuart Broad did is contrary to the spirit of the game. He played the ball and stayed there.”¬†

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