Can I have a diet jalebi, please?

Dieticians are busy reworking diet charts for patients who want to gorge on sweets to enjoy the festive spirit

The lure of juicy rasgullahs, gulab jamuns, hot-dripping jalebis, and melt-in-the mouth kaju katlis can make the best of weight-watchers throw caution to the wind and gorge on the calorie-rich delicacies.

And during the festive season, with boxes of sweets changing hands, a few additional calories are just a small casualty of basking in the festive spirit.

Not being able to resist the temptation, hundreds of Mumbaikars are making a beeline for their dieticians' clinics in the hope to add a bit of sweetness to their plates.

And dietitians in the city are busy re-working and calculating the schedules and meal charts for their clients.

"Even before the festival began, people enrolled in nutrition programmes came in asking for diet plans, which would allow them to enjoy sweets, without harming their existing weight loss plans," said Dr Richa Anand, dietician, Hiranandani hospital.

Chocolates please?
Not just sweets, even chocolates have made an entry to the festive diet platter.

Dr Eileen Canday, chief dietician, Breach Candy Hospital said, "There is a lot preference for chocolates, other than home prepared sweets this season. Chocolates are more of an addiction and thus overeating is possible. I have consulted many women who want to know how to prepare sweets that won't affect the sugar levels of their husbands."

"Besides the weight conscious, diabetics also face a challenge to resist sweets. A patient wanted permission to eat sweets, but I could not allow it as he was insulin dependent," said Dr Canday.

Dr Vaishali Marathe, consultant dietician, Kohinoor Hospital, said, "Eating more sweets basically adds calories, and to balance this over indulgence, I advise patients to go on a complete fruit diet to balance it. Overall, we ask them to eat low calorie sweets and eat baked instead of fried snacks."

You May Like



    Leave a Reply