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CBI inquiry ordered on Kharghar youth's 'suicide' after CID hits a dead end

Almost two years have passed since that day, and it’s been a year since the Bombay High Court ordered a CID inquiry into the death, which the police initially dismissed as a suicide. The distraught father still has no clue what or who claimed his son’s life.


The MiD DAY report that was carried on March 1, 2012

Last week, the division bench of justices PV Hardas and AM Thipsay transferred the case to the CBI. “It appears that in the present investigation, no headway has been made and the investigating officer has not been able to unearth the manner in which Santosh Kumar died. There are several aspects of the investigation for which there is no answer.

The petitioner has raised several grounds in the petition to point out how the investigation has been deficient.... there is really no answer as to how and for what reason the son of the petitioner had committed suicide. The riddle regarding the death of Santosh Kumar has not been solved.”

Suicide or murder?
On July 15, 2011, the boy’s father received a phone call informing him that his son had met with an accident. Singh flew down from his native Bihar to Mumbai. Upon arriving in Kharghar, he was told by Santosh’s roommates Vikas Kumar and Jitendra Kumar that they had all been drinking the previous night, and an inebriated Santosh had killed himself by jumping from the toilet window.

Incredibly, the father had spoken to the boy the previous day and father and son had agreed to pool in their money and buy a motorcycle - actions that were inconsistent with a person wanting to end his life.
During his inquiry, Singh met the police photographer Vijendra Kumar Jha, who had shot pictures and videos of the crime scene. The video’s timestamp revealed it had been recorded on the July 14, 2011 at 8.49 pm, though the police report records the date and time of death as July 15th, 2011 at 2 am.

Not adding up
The police had registered a case of accidental death on the basis of a statement given by Kumar’s roommate and friend, Jitendra Kumar, who had said that the boys had been drinking together the night of the incident. According to the post-mortem report however, no alcohol was found in Santosh’s blood.

Stranger still, Santosh’s injuries were not consistent with having fallen from the fifth floor. Though his body had several ‘incised wounds’ apart from a fracture at the back of his head, none of his bones were broken. The report also indicated signs of urinal discharge, consistent with death by strangulation. Nor was it plausible that a boy of Santosh’s build could fit through the tiny toilet window Santosh supposedly jumped from. His father, Vijay Kumar Singh, then approached the High Court seeking the investigation to be transferred.

But nearly a month after the High Court had ordered the probe to be shifted to the CID, not even an FIR was registered in the case. It was only after a tongue-lashing from the bench that an FIR was registered. Due to the CID’s failure to make headway in the case, Singh’s lawyer Niranjan Mundargi moved the court to transfer the case to CBI.

Appearing for HSC exams? We help you calm your last minute nerves by giving you a few handy tips from teachers Today’s subject: Geography

Mahesh Lavate, Geography professor from Kandivli Education Society

>> Generally the textbook referred to by students is Nirali Prakashan, which has three groups A, B and C. One can expect 60 marks questions from Group A and 20 marks questions from group B.
>> First question is objective type and if answered correctly students can score full marks.
>> Question no. 1,5 and 7 can be solved within 15 minutes and students should not waste too much time behind the same.
>> While question no. 1 is objective, fifth question is on world map and in question no 7, Q.7A is objective again and 7B is Map of Maharashtra.
>> The first three chapters from Group A of the book are very important.  

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