An emergency medical responder designed to beat the traffic and provide on-the-spot medical assistance, an app that helps the hearing-impaired take music lessons, a stove that works using rice husks, and a new design for the Indian Railways sleeper coaches.

A mobile app that helps in learning scripts
A mobile app that helps in learning scripts

These are part of the 150 designs that will be showcased by graduating students of the Industrial Design Centre (IDC) at IIT Bombay, as part of the Design Degree Show (DDS), the annual college festival of IDC.

Based on a Mahindra Reva E20, this is a sketch of an emergency medical service vehicle called First Responder. Designed to carry necessary equipment and paramedics to reach the patient faster than an ambulance, this small vehicle is easier to manoeuvre through traffic
Based on a Mahindra Reva E20, this is a sketch of an emergency medical service vehicle called First Responder. Designed to carry necessary equipment and paramedics to reach the patient faster than an ambulance, this small vehicle is easier to manoeuvre through traffic

Based on the theme, deconstruct, the three-day festival kickstarts on June 27. “Our main aim at DDS is to offer innovative solutions to the city’s daily problems, and start a dialogue with the public on the same,” says Chinmaye Bhave, media and communications manager of DDS 2014.

A rice-husk stove, designed to meet the energy needs in the Sunderbans in West Bengal. The stove can be easily made at a cost of Rs 300- Rs 400 from a local metal works shop
A rice-husk stove, designed to meet the energy needs in the Sunderbans in West Bengal. The stove can be easily made at a cost of Rs 300- Rs 400 from a local metal works shop

A large part at the festival focusses on audio-visual solutions/designs produced with an aim to create awareness on issues like traffic and garbage disposal, among others.

“There are a total of 58 students graduating this year, and each will be presenting at least two to three projects, making it a total of 150 over three days,” adds Bhave.

A design of a sleeper coach for the Indian Railways
A design of a sleeper coach for the Indian Railways

While design exhibitions will rule the festival, visitors will also get a chance to interact and learn from industry stalwarts through workshops on Day One, and a series of conferences on Day Two and Three.

The workshops will cover topics such as game design, raku pottery (a type of Japanese pottery), photography, storytelling and puppetry, whereas the conference section will see 12 speakers, including Mike Knowles, MP Rajan, Amardeep Behl and others, from the field of design.

There will be a special section featuring projects designed by the IDC faculty, which will be a part of the Mumbai Transformation Plan. Some of the projects include pedestrian and bicycle pathways, bus shelters with toilets and water fountains, public information systems,  garbage disposable systems and data visualisation tools, among others.

Bhave says the festival is open to all but visitors will be required to pay Rs 3,000 to attend a workshop and Rs 3,500 for each day of the conference. Students, however, will get a 50% discount. Mumbaikars will be able to catch the exhibition and designs again, in a two-day public exhibition which will be held at the Nehru Centre, starting on July 5.