Next

Diaries from Melbourne: Indian cricketers' truckload of kits

Wherever the Indian team travels, it carries along huge baggage. And one is not referring to the host of injuries this World Cup team has been carrying along. In fact, whenever the team goes for practice sessions, there is a huge truckload full of the players’ kits and training gear that follows them.

LEFT: A member of the logistics team loads one of Team India’s kitbags into a truck after a practice session at the Junction Oval in St Kilda, Melbourne yesterday. pics/ashwin ferro
A member of the logistics team loads one of Team India’s kitbags into a truck after a practice session at the Junction Oval in St Kilda, Melbourne yesterday. Pics/Ashwin Ferro

One would’ve thought that the huge buses the players travel in would be spacious enough to carry their kitbags, but that’s not the case. Yesterday, after a practice session at the Junction Oval, the logistics staff was seen loading all the kitbags and training gear into a huge truck that left much after the players had left, and had obviously arrived at the venue much before them too.

The Life Saving Club at the South Melbourne beach
The Life Saving Club at the South Melbourne beach

It is learnt that each player has at least two kitbags, with some of the batsmen having even three given they carry almost a dozen bats at times. Then there is other training gear like nets, plastic cones, steppers, etc that also occupy adequate space in the back of the truck.

Melbourne’s very own Baywatch
With almost 80 per cent of the Australian population living beachside or at a short distance from the sea, water safety is one of the most important activities for children. And the South Melbourne Life Saving Club is one of the oldest and most famous clubs at South Melbourne beach. The century-old club, started way back in 1913, teaches over 200 children, from the age group of 8 to 18, as members along with their parents, how to not just swim but more importantly, how to save lives.

Drowning has been one of the most prominent causes of deaths in Australia and over the years authorities have managed to bring down the number of drowning deaths from around 70 to 30 by training kids from a very young age.

The kids learn surfing and rescuing activities besides swimming. “It is also a significant job prospect as kids can grow up to be valuable lifeguards across the shores of not just Australia but anywhere in the world,” said Stefanie King, mother of one of the young members here.

You May Like

MORE FROM JAGRAN

0 Comments

    Leave a Reply