Doctor orders patient's kin to get 70 gloves

After receiving such complaints, senior doctors at KEM have asked each department to display list of available items

After relatives of admitted patients at KEM hospital questioned why they were being asked to procure hospital equipment -- such as gloves -- that is usually provided in-house, embarrassed senior doctors have instructed all the departments to conduct an inventory of the equipment available with them, and display the list within the hospital premises.

The matter came to light on Sunday, when the kin of two admitted patients lodged a complaint with the administration against three resident doctors of the Orthopaedics department, alleging that they had been asked to procure 70 pairs of gloves from outside the hospital for surgery.

Senior doctors held a meeting yesterday to identify the reason why residents have been mentioning objects like gloves, in their prescriptions for patients. In a bid to prevent such shady prescriptions in the future, the office bearers have decided that every department has to inventory the available equipment and put up a list of the same, in the form of notices. All the resident doctors in the hospital have been sternly prohibited from writing these unnecessary prescriptions for their patients in future. 

Speaking to MiD DAY, Dr Pradeep Bhosale, head of department, Orthopaedics, at KEM Hospital said, "The instruments used in the surgeries are extremely sharp, and it is essential for us to wear high quality gloves of the proper size. Sometimes we don't get the right size of gloves from the hospital authorities in sufficient quantities. To avoid infection, doctors wear three pair of gloves, and sometimes change them during procedures. Servants also need to don gloves."

Bhosale added, "We have warned the resident doctors to refrain from writing unnecessary prescriptions. A notice will be displayed outside every surgical department, enlisting the available equipment. Only when something is required urgently, will it be prescribed from outside."

A resident doctor from KEM hospital said, on condition of anonymity, "Many of the basic equipment are not available at the wards. Sometimes the items are not made available on time. With at least 10-15 routine surgeries taking place on a daily basis, we don't have a choice but to prescribe it from outside."

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