Don't just dump your laptop!

The horde of smart phones, laptops, tablets and several other gadgets flooding the markets is endless. While we generously pump moolah into the next iPhone or smartphone, how about earning some on the sly? Reglobe, an e-waste management company, is willing to pay you hard cash while they pick up that piece of junk from your doorstep.

Nakul Kumar (left) and Mandeep Manocha (right), founders of

How it works
Meet 27-year-old Mandeep Manocha and Nakul Kumar, 29 who floated this initiative mid-January this year. Kumar mentions, “We are the first company of its kind that purchases e-waste online.” Mumbai, Delhi and NCR residents have reasons to rejoice, as they don’t need to make those harrowing trips to Lamington Road or Nehru Place anymore. Kumar says, “We have developed an extensive algorithm to estimate the price that includes looking into the specifications and current or last price at which it is / was sold.”

 This ascertains that you are getting the right price, a tough thing for a second-hand. “All you need to know is your model number. We have even put up a tutorial for you to discover if it’s an issue. In three to four clicks you come to a quotation,” says Manocha. Soon after both accomplished the must-have MBA the duo had their eye firmly on this domain even four years ago. But after brief tie-ups that included creating collection centres, they opted for a recycling plant. After scrapping rubber and plastic to oil, by November last year re-use was back in vogue.

Lap this up
The website also offers second-hand laptops that are completely refurbished. A second-hand Apple MacBook Pro was sold for `28,599 only. Till now, they have been getting two to three pick-ups daily, shares Manocha; while both stress on how they have sold 200-300 laptops already. The sweeteners — seven days replacement policy after delivery, one-year technical support and in case of damage, refund is also an option.

The most ancient model the duo has taken in till now is a Dell laptop from 2001 that needless to say belonged to a museum. As the system was naturally beyond hope the owner sensibly offered it for recycling, an activity the company facilitates with suitable tie-ups.

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Did you know?
Only 12.5 percent of e-waste is currently recycled all over the world. 

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