Draping it like Sridevi

Krittika Sharma’ Textile designer

I would think it’s about holding on to their knowledge, skill set and values. Many artisans are keen on taking large orders that keep their looms occupied up to three years. While this is great for business, they stop practicing their traditional techniques. They don’t have the time or inclination to innovate on their traditional designs. That leaves them vulnerable.

2. What do your designs represent?
As a designer, my work attempts to educate people about my artisans and my craft. Design is an amalgamation of making something beautiful that has a meaning and has a function – a holistic product that comprises of quality, style and value. My label was created to give voices to my family of artisans. Craft is what we often take for granted in India. My goal is to tell stories through my fabric, marry tradition with likely future trends and showcase beautiful possibilities to the people.

3. How did your designs become a part of English Vinglish?
Sridevi wore three of my shaded saris. The main stylist of the film showed some of my pieces to the director (Gauri Shinde), and they were selected.

India on a weave
Loved Sridevi’s simple saris in English Vinglish? Textile designer Krittika Sharma’s exhibition that’s currently showing in the city, has been working with craftsmen from West Bengal, Gujarat, Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Tamil Nadu and Madhya Pradesh. Some of her designs on display at the exhibition graced Sridevi in this film made by Gauri Shinde.

Till November 7
At artisans’, Kala Ghoda.
Call 22673040 

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