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Endoscopy removes stent left in woman's bile duct 12 years ago

Four days ago, MiD DAY reported how Rajkumari Mishra (65) discovered that a 16 mm stent was lodged in her bile duct, where it had been inserted 12 years ago during a cholecystectomy at KEM Hospital (‘KEM doctors forgot stent in woman’s body 12 years ago,’ July 20).

Rajkumari Mishra
End of painful chapter: MiD DAY on July 20 (below) had reported how Rajkumari Mishra discovered that a 16 mm stent was lodged in her bile duct, where it had been inserted 12 years ago during a cholecystectomy at KEM Hospital. The article was removed through an endoscopic procedure

The wire-like particle was finally removed on Tuesday in a 30 minute-long endoscopic procedure performed at the civic-run Sion Hospital.

Mishra, who suffered from painful swelling in her abdominal region, is now only one step away from closing a painful chapter in her life.

Mishra’s gall bladder was removed surgically through a cholecystectomy in the Parel hospital on July 1, 2001. Before the major open surgery, she underwent a procedure known as endoscopic stenting, in which a stent was inserted in her bile duct to prevent it from narrowing due to the gallstones before the open surgery.

While the cholecystectomy was successfully conducted in 2001, the stent was not removed following the surgery, says Rajkumari’s son Anand. Doctors say that the stent should be removed within six weeks from the open surgery.

Speaking to MiD DAY, Anand said, “After the CT scans were conducted last week, we were shocked to discover that a stent was causing the pain and swelling. Back then, we were not informed that it had to be removed a few weeks after the major surgery.”

“Thankfully, doctors informed us that the stent could be extracted from the bile duct through an endoscopy, and much to our relief, the procedure was completed in 30 minutes on Tuesday morning,” he added.

Rajkumari is now convalescing in the general ward of Sion Hospital, from where she will soon be discharged. However, the 65-year-old’s ordeal will be over only after she undergoes treatment for her incisional hernia, which was the result of an incompletely healed surgical wound. “We were informed that the hernia will be treated a while after she is discharged,” said Anand.

Docspeak
Dr Avinash Supe, dean of Sion Hospital, who was previously the head of the gastroenterology department of KEM Hospital, said the procedure performed to remove the stent was a relatively simple one.

“As one of our doctors performed the procedure, I am unaware if it was a stent or a stone that was causing the symptoms. However, I assured Anand that there was no reason to panic as such a particle can be easily extracted through endoscopy and would not cause any further problems for the patient. Mostly, she won’t even have to undergo surgery for treating the hernia if it does not cause any further discomfort for her.”  

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