He's written 365 letters to the PM

Meet Dinesh Talwar. A regular 42-year-old from Meerut Uttar Pradesh who runs a departmental store. That is, when he is not writing memorandums on population control to the Prime Minister Dr. Manmohan Singh. In the year 2010, Talwar submitted his memorandum to the District magistrate of Meerut addressed to the PM 365 times, one copy per day for the whole year.

Activist Dinesh Talwar, in New Delhi, on Wednesday. Pic/ Rajeev Tyagi

Today, on World Population Day, the man stood at Jantar Mantar in the Capital, with his wife, mother children and friends to drive home the message. “When India got Independence in 1947 we were 33 crore. Today we have become a nation of 121 crore (1.21 billion). What is the PM doing about it?” questions Talwar.

His memorandum suggests stringent measures like China’s one-child policy couples with only one child to be provided special facilities by the government and film stars to take initiative and publicize the cause. He also demands the appointment of a district population control officer which he believes has been ignored by policy makers keeping in mind vote banks. “There should be a law which forbids politicians who have more than two children to contest elections,” says Talwar.

Talwar runs a self-funded NGO called Surbhi Parivar Foundation. The man claims he has protested 42 times in Delhi since 1994, held nukkad nataks in Dehra Dun, Meerut and conducted pad yatras in all over Western UP. Since yesterday, I have decided a new form of protest. “We will go to schools, colleges and all other institutions and make the citizens write one lakh 21 thousand postcards addressed to the PM,” informs Talwar.

Members of Surbhi Pariwar demonstrating at Jantar Mantar in New Delhi. Pic/Rajeev Tyagi

The man is supported in his endeavour by his mother, wife and two kids. “I use to be a little shy about his cause but now I support him throughout,” say Isha, married to Dinesh for the pass 19 years.

But apart from family and community, political parties seem to have ignored the man so far. “I have been to all political party offices in Delhi but none seem to be willing to come up with serious solutions for our ever increasing population. The leaders have to take personal initiative,” says Talwar. Putting her father crusade into words 13 year old Simran Talwar sums it up, “Desh ka neta hoga woh, jiske bacche honge do. That is the India, I want to live in.”

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