I am disorganised, says Pritam

It is usually tough to nail Pritam down for an interview. So when the music director, known for his media-shy nature, gave a green signal for a tete-a-tete, we didn’t want to let the opportunity go. Here is an excerpt from the chat:


Why do you resist interviews?
I’m a genuinely shy person. Before every film’s release, the producer goes mad trying to make me appear before the media. I’m still not comfortable. Though people need to be very diplomatic during interviews, I tend to speak whatever I feel.

You are doing your 100th film as a music director?
Yes, Milan Luthria’s next will be my 100th film. I have been working as a music director for 12 years now. I have really cut down on my work and I’m trying to do more of that.

Is it true that you don’t deliver on time?
I’m the epitome of disorganisation and I’m critical of my work. So I keep on remixing, re-dubbing, etc. Like for my track Daru Desi in Cocktail, before Shalmali Kholgade could finally sing the song, I had made 10 other girls do it. I was not getting the right voice… In the time I make one song, others can bring out five! That’s why I decided to go easy on my work!

With 100 films, are you scared there will be nothing original left?
The biggest challenge is that one should not end up sounding the same. For example, AR Rahman’s old music is very different from what it is now.

Which is the film that changed your career?
Dhoom! It altered things for me as I began receiving more work and appreciation. Tum Mile was one of my favourite albums but that went unnoticed.

Is it a good time for musicians in India?
In India music directors don’t survive for a long time. The workload is too much and you reach a burnout stage very soon, as we try to take on as much work as possible. Another reason is we don’t get royalty. Yes, the recent change in the Act regarding royalties is worth saluting. May be the next generation can benefit from this act.

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