I'd never hurt the boy who shot me: Malala

The 16-year-old, tipped to receive the next Nobel Peace Prize, suffered horrific injuries in the Taliban attack.

But Malala insisted she would never want revenge on the thug who shot her on a school bus.

From almost dead to Nobel contender: Malala’s memoirs are released worldwide on the eve of her shooting anniversary. In her book, she talks of the ordeal she went through and her love for TV shows Masterchef and Ugly Betty. Pic/AFP

She said, “I can’t imagine it -- that boy who shot me, I can’t -- imagine hurting him even with a needle. I believe in peace. I believe in mercy.”

She was taken to a Birmingham hospital after being shot in Pakistan a year ago today. Speaking about her attacker, she said: “He was quite young, in his 20s – we may call him a boy. Maybe that’s why his hand was shaking. But people are brainwashed. That’s why they do things like suicide attacks and killing people.”
The young campaigner was targeted for defying a ban on female education in her home region of Swat.

She tells of her ordeal in her book, I Am Malala, which went on sale worldwide yesterday.

The teenager says her move to -- Britain has made her a telly addict, and that she’s hooked on Masterchef and Ugly Betty.

And the book describes a normal girl who bickers constantly with her younger brothers Khushal and Apal.

Malala and her family are now under police watch in Birmingham, after the Taliban repeated their vow to murder her.

She finds out on Friday if she wins the Nobel Prize for promoting girls’ education around the world.

Meanwhile, Malala spoke of her desire to do more to promote education, saying she felt she had not yet earned the Nobel accolade.

“There are many people who deserve the Nobel Peace Prize and I think that I still need to work a lot. In my opinion I have not done that much to win the Nobel Peace Prize,” she said.

Doctor who saved Malala says she deserves Nobel
The British children's doctor who helped save the life of 14-year-old Pakistani activist Malala Yousafzai has told her remarkable story, saying that she believes her patient deserves to win the Nobel Peace Prize. Pakistani doctors performed emergency surgery but her Malala’s condition deteriorated while she was in intensive care, and authorities asked Reynolds to help. “In Peshawar, her father had been told by the doctors before I arrived to pray for her, and he took that to mean that she was dying. He actually started to make preparations for her funeral,” Reynolds said, adding, “She’s very deserving, she has brought the world’s attention to very important issues. I’m biased,I think she deserves it, but it's up to the the Nobel Peace Prize committee to decide.”

According to reports, even Reynolds’ friends and colleagues were unaware of her role in saving Malala’s life - until her patient insisted the story be told.  

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