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Meet the lady of the rings

Merging the personal relationship of a piece of jewellery to its public purpose of adornment, Esther Brinkmann showcases her unusual jewellery pieces in the exhibition, Renewable Pleasures: The Indian Chapter

"A piece of jewellery should provoke! Provoke questions, provoke emotions, provoke desires!" says Esther Brinkmann. This Swiss-born jewellery designer has been a celebrated artist for creating handmade jewellery which in her words, "offers a specific relationship to the body, which questions our behaviour and our needs in life: meaningful activities and relationships, relaxing and spiritual moments, emotion and beauty." Brinkmann shares how she was compelled to take up jewellery designing in the first place, "When I was in my 20s, I saw two Multiples by Dieter Roth (a famous artist who worked with many different medias) at the Art Fair in Basel, his Zoo Rings and the Huts. For the first time, I perceived that there was a different way to consider jewellery and I decided to study jewellery in Geneva, where I was living."

Untitled, double ring, Gold and oxidised iron, 2000 - 2012
Untitled, double ring, Gold and oxidised iron, 2000 - 2012

Brinkmann has been in Mumbai for four years, and will now be featuring her jewellery pieces in the exhibition, Renewable Pleasures: The India Chapter. Wife of the Consul General of Switzerland, Brinkmann has been borrowing inspiration from various kinds of places, every four years or so, including China before she took up residence in the city.

Fragments of Flowers
Fragments of Flowers, double ring, enamel on gold, 2014

The Asian imprint
"Living and travelling in India since the last four years was a great inspiration for my work. Interested in art, architecture, textiles, traditional garments, objects for everyday use, etc; I get many occasions to be inspired. But the main process is happening in my studio when I sit and start to make models and then construct the pieces with silver, gold or iron," shares Brinkmann.

For her upcoming exhibition, she also collaborated with national award-winning Meenakar, Kamal Kumar. On that note, Brinkmann says, "Living in India where no space is empty, where colour and ornament is omnipresent, I took the challenge of introducing ornament and colour in my work. The beauty of Mughal jewellery fascinates me and getting the chance to be introduced to Kamal in Jaipur enabled me to start the collaboration. Unlike a designer, I build my shapes in metal myself, I draw the ornament on the shape and then send it to the enamel master."

Till: August 23, 11 am to 7 pm
At: Chemould Prescott Road, Queens Mansion, G Talwatkar Marg, Fort.
Call: 22000211/12

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