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Movie review: 'Ajeyo'

Ajeyo
U; Drama
Dir: Jahnu Barua
Cast: Rupam Chetia, Jupitora Bhuyan, Pratibha, Munmi Kalita
Ratings: 4 Stars

Scotland recently voted against independence. And last week, politics in the name of Love Jihad raised its head once again in Uttar Pradesh. Considering these two recent events, Ajeyo couldn’t have found a better time to release in the city. Directed by Jahnu Barua, it talks about the price one has to pay for independence and how invaluable love is. But more importantly, the film distinguishes the right from the wrong without being harsh on either. It highlights the truth about human flaws.

There’s a sense of balance between societal mores and the pragmatism required to deal with them in Ajeyo
There’s a sense of balance between societal mores and the pragmatism required to deal with them in Ajeyo

Based on a novel, this Assamese film unfolds through a narrative flashback that moves at a rapid pace. Focusing on a free-spirited young man named Gojen, the screenplay takes us back to those uncertain days when an independent India was imminent, but its division wasn’t. By the time, the India-Pakistan partition became a reality, too much of blood had been shed.

Focusing on a free-spirited young man named Gojen, the screenplay takes us back to those uncertain days when an independent India was imminent, but its division wasn’t
Focusing on a free-spirited young man named Gojen, the screenplay takes us back to those uncertain days when an independent India was imminent, but its division wasn’t

Regardless, throughout the film, the protagonist follows his heart. Even though he fails to complete his education, it doesn’t stop him from making a difference to the lives of people he cares about. And while he’s at it, the short conversation he keeps having with his grandma is delightful. He speaks his mind while his moral compass boosts his idealistic outlook. However, despite all these qualities, he isn’t spared from the scars inflicted by the partition.

The film has a certain calm air about it; even the dramatic scenes shy away from excess. Furthermore, every single scene is well-defined and thoroughly executed. This is why the two-hour long film doesn’t come across as a stretch.

The story revolves around a few central characters — all of them well-sketched — in a village in Assam but affects the entire nation. There’s a sense of balance between societal mores and the pragmatism required to deal with them.

As far as performances go, Rupam Chetia is remarkable as the protagonist. Jupitora Bhuyan, who plays his love interest by accident, does a good job too. Pratibha does a fine job in her role as an adorable grandmother.

If you’re looking to watch a realistic film, you don’t want to miss this one.

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