Mumbai Diary: Friday frolics

The city — sliced, diced and served with a dash of sauce

Misfit, and how
Indian journalists asking the how-do-you-feel-about questions is a cliché now. But we came across a viral video featuring a journo from Doordarshan that made us wonder what could be the nadir of film journalism.

The journalist wasn’t speaking Chinese but the look on Tony Leung’s face suggests she did
The journalist wasn’t speaking Chinese but the look on Tony Leung’s face suggests she did

Covering the International Film Festival of India (IFFI) in Goa, this young reporter seemed to be in the dark, going by her queries and statements. For instance, she asked actor Tony Leung whether he likes watching movies. And she just went on and on, putting her foot in her mouth.

The only thing working for her was her remarkable confidence in messing up her repertoire. Although her words sounded benign, trust us, they weren’t. It was a clear case of indifference towards one’s job, not to mention plain old ignorance.

Besides, she introduced a lady as governor of India! The entire video was a downhill ride and we wonder how a public service broadcaster can be so incompetent in choosing the appropriate scribe for an event like IFFI. Anyway, for the moment, we laugh along.

Silent tribute to Hughes
The demise of Australian opener Phillip Hughes was felt even at the Mumbai Schools Sports Association (MSSA) Harris Shield Elite Division boys’ U-16 inter-school matches at Shivaji Park yesterday.

Young players, officials and staff at Shivaji Park mourn Phil Hughes. Pic/Atul Kamble
Young players, officials and staff at Shivaji Park mourn Phil Hughes. Pic/Atul Kamble

After the Day Three match ended, IES VN Sule Guruji (Dadar) and Anjuman-I-Islam Allana English (CST) match officials, coaching staff and players observed a two-minute silence for the departed cricketer. The 25-year-old died in a Sydney hospital of injuries he sustained in domestic cricket after being hit by a rising ball.

Living to Diet!
Ditzy Definitions: Skeleton - Someone who started dieting... but forgot to stop.

Keeping track of history
Western Railway is holding an exhibition at Bandra railway station (West), to mark the 150th year of the western lines in Mumbai. It will be inaugurated by Hemant Kumar, general manager of Western Railway, today, and will be open to the public till Sunday from 10am to 7 pm. Entry is free.

The western line is 150 years old
The western line is 150 years old

Bombay Baroda and Central India (BB&CI) Railway, the precursor of Western Railway, started the construction of the railway line from Utran, and it reached Grant Road in 1864. The first BB&CI Railway train on the western coastal lines of Bombay (now Mumbai) chugged into Grant Road station from Ahmedabad in Gujarat 150 years ago, heralding a new era of seamless rail connectivity.

To mark this historic landmark, Western Railway plans to showcase its rich heritage in the form of posters, photographs, models, scrollers, etc. Models of a steam engine, a BB&CI EMU coach, a working train, etc will be among the attractions at the exhibition. It also plans to showcase silver cutlery of the era of BB&CI railway which was used in the dining cars of the trains.

Western Railway has also come up with three interesting books on this occasion which will be released shortly, containing Marathi version of articles compiled from old issues of the BB&CI magazines and West Rail journals, describing the growth of western lines along with the growth of Mumbai city.

Western Railway has also published a booklet containing rare photographs and details of locomotives which have now become a part of history after serving the Western Railway for more than a century.

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