Mumbai Diary: Monday musings

The city — sliced, diced and served with a dash of sauce

Let's Mumba No 5?
Hold your breath, literally. Especially if you are a player. If you are a spectator, you can hold your breath at moments when things get too edge-of-the-seat. We are saying this because the first leg in Season II of the Pro-Kabaddi League is set to begin. Talking about seats, U Mumba, the Mumbai team, has announced the offline sale of tickets for their home games scheduled to take place between July 18 and 21.

U Mumba played against Jaipur Pink Panthers in the final of the Pro Kabaddi League at NSCI, Worli last year. Pic/Suresh KK
U Mumba played against Jaipur Pink Panthers in the final of the Pro Kabaddi League at NSCI, Worli last year. Pic/Suresh KK

U Mumba returns to their home ground, the National Sports Club of India (NSCI) in Mumbai, for the home leg for the team. Tickets are being sold at the venue (NSCI). We liked that students are being offered special discounts on display of their valid college ID cards. Students can buy Section 3 tickets, originally priced at R800 (on the weekend), and Rs 700 (on weekdays) for a flat Rs 150.

A good incentive for college kids to watch this game. We’re not sure if this is to fill in the seats or to ensure that students have an easy-on-the-wallet option. Maybe, a bit of both, but it is a cheerful kabaddi cocktail. This time, if U Mumba wins the title (they lost in the final last year), they could look at a victory anthem and call it ‘Mumba No 5’, after Lou Bega’s hit, ‘Mambo No 5’. Like, we’re just saying… no coercion there.

An eye on the clock
The community spirit in Mumbai has always been integral, and it remains a matter of immense pride for city folk. We spotted one such example during a recent shopping trail at Bandra’s Linking Road.

A signboard was installed near the shopping stalls and kiosks to announce the daily time for iftaar that was meant to benefit the store owners in the neighbourhood. We like.

Hi-tech, and how!
In this age of iPods and SoundCloud, we still love cabs with music systems. Imagine our delight when we hailed a kaali-peeli that not just had a music system, but a mini TV as well!

The Allahabad-born Santosh, has been a taxi driver for 12 years. Being a film buff, he had recently installed a tiny screen beside the steering wheel. From Baby Doll to Badtameez Dil, he had stored videos of Bollywood tracks, and had movies too!

“It works on a battery; I insert my pen drive to play movies and music. It’s a way to entertain passengers during traffic jams,” he beamed. He regaled us with stories about meeting Salman Khan at a city marathon and the time when he helped push a tractor for a shoot in a Rani Mukerji film.

No kidding, science rocks
Nehru Planetarium at Worli’s Nehru Centre is keen that Mumbai's kids get hooked on to science. They’ve kicjed off a set of lecture demonstration programmes where eminent working scientists will connect with students from Mumbai’s secondary and higher secondary schools.

Students appear engrossed during the demonstration
Students appear engrossed during the demonstration

These scientists will speak on topics that are either closely related to the curriculum or on topics of current scientific interest. Visual aids and on-stage demonstrations will prep these lectures that will be conducted on every second Saturday in English and on fourth Saturdays in Marathi at the Hall of Culture, Nehru Centre.

The opening lecture, ‘Let’s take it Lightly’, held last Saturday, had Professor Sushil Mujumdar of Tata Institute of Fundamental Research speak to students about the properties of light rays. The lecture also highlighted how laser light is made and used for different applications.

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