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Mumbai Diary page: Saturday Scene

The city — sliced, diced and served with a dash of sauce

Guitar girls amidst the gallops
The Hooves clubhouse at the Royal Western India Turf Club (RWITC) at Mahalaxmi is all ready to host an entertainment programme today, 8 pm onwards.

Today there will be guitar beats instead of hoofbeats
Today there will be guitar beats instead of hoofbeats

The Hooves, whose patrons are usually seen enjoying their meals amidst some horse talk, is getting ready to catch the band 2 Girlz & A Guitar. A chef’s special is also on the menu and so is a barbecue counter.

If you’re hungry enough to eat a horse, you know where to go. This, one thinks, is one more addition to the multi-faceted space the Mahalaxmi is turning into. For those interested in knowing more, call the RWITC office at 23071401/1407.

Art is where the village is
Those of us accustomed to city-based exhibitions may not realize how difficult it is for artists to actually get their paintings and other works of art to reach connoisseurs’ eyes. For artists who hail from rural areas, this task is bound to be even more onerous.

(L to R) Vivek Wadkar, Rajendra Dagde and Pradip Ghatge
(L to R) Vivek Wadkar, Rajendra Dagde and Pradip Ghatge

Four youths from a village near Karjat have decided to eschew the city altogether, and display and sell their paintings in Karjat and nearby areas such as Pen, Khopoli and Panvel.

Portraits of village life. Pics/Shrikant Khuperkar
Portraits of village life. Pics/Shrikant Khuperkar

The young artists have made forays into Mumbai but their village is some distance away from Karjat, which is itself some 100 km from CST.

Sachin Savant
Sachin Savant

So it makes more viable sense to exhibit in the environs. The next time you are driving along those roads on a leisurely trip, stop when you see the local artists. Their work is good, and you will be lending them a helping hand as well as adorning your walls.

The original angry birds
You may have heard about people being attacked by the common house crow (Corvus splendens) while doing nothing more than walking along the road to the bus stop or the neighbourhood grocery store.

They look cute here but they can turn hostile when defending their nest or young ones
They look cute here but they can turn hostile when defending their nest or young ones

One of our colleagues told us about such an incident, occurring repeatedly during this week. It seems to be the same crow dive-bombing and pecking at his head every time, and the victim is doing nothing more than going for a walk.

Some theories have it that the crows are your ancestors and are either punishing you for disrespecting them, or alternatively blessing you for something good you have done. We rather think it depends on which pandit you consult.

But bird experts tell us that crows are very family-oriented (they tend to mate for life, for one thing) and will go to extremes to protect their nest and their young ones, if they perceive a threat.

This could currently be the season when fledglings are learning to fly, and if one youngster has perchance fallen in the area, the parents will in all likelihood try to keep everyone away from it.

So if you are being attacked by a crow, just change your route. Of course, if the crow simply happens to not like your face, there’s nothing you or we can do about it!

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