Mumbai Diary: Saturday Dossier

The city — sliced, diced and served with a dash of sauce

The bard, with a twist
The Bard of Avon is the flavour of the season as the world marks 400 years of Shakespeare. Closer home, Kitab Khana, which is much more than just a bookstore, has its own spin on the anniversary.

Rati Dady Wadia, curator the invitation from Kitab Khana
Rati Dady Wadia, curator the invitation from Kitab Khana

The store says: ‘Friend, Shakespearean, Everyman (Everywoman), lend us your ears, we come to celebrate Shakespeare, and to commemorate Him.’ What caught our attention was the invitation for an event slated for April 23 (5.30 pm onwards) and on April 24 (11.30 am onwards).

Rati Dady Wadia, curator the invitation from Kitab Khana

The invitation hints that the event will be about ‘Shakespeare, minus the tiresome tit-bits’ and also a ‘Midsummer Night’s Banghara Rap.’ The do will be curated by Mumbai’s most famous Shakespeare teacher, Rati Dady Wadia, (she used to teach Shakespeare in several schools wearing a Shakespeare T-shirt). We’ll be there for sure.

For the mobile reader
Finally, the Indian app for reading has arrived as Chiki Sarkar’s Juggernaut rolls. The app, available on the Android platform with iOS to follow a week later, has much to offer everyone. A book on India’s superfoods by Rujuta Diwekar and a novel by Pakistan’s hit TV writer Umera Ahmed are the highlights.

Rujuta Diwekar
Rujuta Diwekar

Then there is sex, crime, love, non-fiction all covered in over 100 titles in the app. On downloading, users can browse through covers, previews and categories to discover new titles, sample them, and gift books to friends. The app also notifies readers about author-related events.

“All publishers want to bring their readers and writers close to each other and find new readers for themselves. This is our dream for the app,” says Sarkar. We look forward to what reality holds in the world of books.

From Mumbai to Lahore
A few days back, we had reported that The Bombay Review would conduct a bi-city literary event called The India-Pakistan project — 2016 in Mumbai and Lahore last Thursday.

Our friends in both venues mailed us a few photos from the event. (Top) Annie Zaidi (in black) and Janhavi Acharekar (in red) in conversation with Shruti Sunderraman in the Mumbai chapter; (above) Pakistani poet and novelist Kanza Javed [in red] in conversation with The Bombay Review’s collaborator, Baneen Fatima at the Lahore chapter. The event comprising talks and workshops was held simultaneously in both cities.

Shaadi ke side effects
A wedding is rarely a cakewalk, and preparing for it is even more gruelling.

Our photographer snapped soon-to-wed Bipasha Basu and Karan Singh Grover exiting her Bandra residence on Friday afternoon, and wrapping up what we think must have been a last-minute something to return home late evening. Pics/Satej Shinde

A crowd for the Queer film fest
Recently, we learnt of a heartening effort to crowdfund Kashish- Mumbai's International LGBT Film festival, and also South Asia’s largest that takes place from May 25-29. This will be the fourth year in a row that KASHISH will be a crowd-funded affair.

This time, we hear that has joined them as title partner in their mission to voice LGBTQ issues in mainstream spaces. The festival theme is 7 Shades of Love — romantic love, love between friends, love between parents and children; from the first stirrings of love between young lovers to the enduring love of committed partners; the love for humanity and the love and acceptance of one’s true self.

Watch this space for more updates.

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