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Mumbai Diary: Saturday scene

The city -- sliced, diced and served with a dash of sauce

Slithering away
THE Maharashtra Police Headquarters in Colaba, which is daily visited by many top-brass police officials, had an unexpected visitor late on Tuesday night — a Russell's Viper, over two feet long.

HISSY FIT: Yogesh Patel with the snake, who might have wanted to join the police force but instead was taken back to its natural habitat — the jungle
HISSY FIT: Yogesh Patel with the snake, who might have wanted to join the police force but instead was taken back to its natural habitat — the jungle

A police constable on the duty saw the snake and alerted the NGO SARRP (Spreading Awareness on Reptiles and Rehabilitation Program). Yogesh Patel, an MSc in Zoology and a volunteer at the NGO, went to the spot and safely rescued the snake. SARRP President Santosh Shinde said the snake was released back into the wild.

Unusual sounds
WITH the season of open-air events under way, one of our regular drop-in venues is the Farmer’s Market (www.farmersmarket.co.in ), held at the Maharashtra Nature Park in the city, from 10am to 3pm.

LISTEN UP: Sunday’s your chance to hear this instrument. PIC/COURTESY WIKIMEDIA COMMONS
LISTEN UP: Sunday’s your chance to hear this instrument. PIC/COURTESY WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Tomorrow, the lineup includes a performance on the morchang, or mouth-harp, a traditional instrument played in Rajasthan, Tamil Nadu and Sindh in Pakistan, among other places. The morchang is also called the morsing or mukharshanku, and is usually played during talavadya, or percussion ensembles. It also makes a good accompanying instrument, however, and you can find out what it sounds like when Varun and Satpal present their performance of tribal music plus modern electronica this Sunday.

Cleaning Course
THE Royal Western India Turf Club (RWITC) headquaters at Mahalaxmi race course, had a pre-Mumbai season, initiative. Called Swabhimane Bachhe, Swachh Bharat. It was a clean-up operation at the race course, where 35 children participated.

BOSE FOR IT: You can bet on cleanliness, say the children, Rahul Bose and Vivek Jain (r), as the Mumbai season gets off to a sweeping start. PIC/SURESH KK
BOSE FOR IT: You can bet on cleanliness, say the children, Rahul Bose and Vivek Jain (r), as the Mumbai season gets off to a sweeping start. PIC/SURESH KK

It was dil bole broom, broom as kids from S Mumbai schools, spent their Children’s Day morning wielding cleaning tools, cleaning the extreme end of the car park near the Hornby Vellard Gate. RWITC chairman Vivek Jain led the cleaning effort and there was actor Rahul Bose, who is part of many civic efforts, lending a touch of ‘celebrity’ to the exercise. One hopes this is not a one-off and becomes a regular feature in the club’s Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) dossier. This open and pleasant land, 226 acres of SoBo’s green emerald, is in a fight for its existence thanks to the lease issue (the club’s 100 year-old lease has expired and it is awaiting renewal) which is the big, hold-your-breath factor this season.. Let’s hope that too, is a sweep-ing success.

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