Mumbai Diary: Saturday scene

The city — sliced, diced and served with a dash of sauce

A topic for charcha
Taking a (tea) leaf out of Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s ‘Chai pe Charcha’ campaign, the city will soon have a guided tour called Chai Pe Charcha — The Tea Trail.

A typical day at Kyani and Co in Dhobi Talao. Pic/Pradeep Dhivar
A typical day at Kyani and Co in Dhobi Talao. Pic/Pradeep Dhivar

When we first saw this email from the organisers of this new tea history walk, we were amused by their use of the catch phrase and also the tag line, which reminded us of Bollywood cinema from the 1990s that also used tag lines like Daag — The Fire!

To be conducted on September 19, the tour will trace the history of tea in India — from the beverage being introduced to the country by the British to India now being one of the world’s largest producers of tea with 13,000 gardens and a workforce of more than two million people involved in its production.

The walk will also offer a customised ‘chai’ experience, and an exclusive tea tasting of India’s finest teas at a tea boutique along with sampling Mumbai’s famous tapri chai and unique Irani chai.

Vegan Chinese, anyone?
Of late the city has been experimenting with a variety of regional and experimental cuisines. Have you ever thought of going Vegan with Pan Asian cuisine?

Will it woo the vegan?
Will it woo the vegan?

Now you will get that too. So whether you want to avoid animal products for ethical reasons or because you are looking for a healthier diet and lifestyle, you can order “vegan Chindian food” from a a city-based chain called Noodle Play.

You can try Fried Rice with fiery Hot Garlic Sauce, steamed rice with Red Thai Curry and Vegan Thai Chilly Basil rice with Veg Manchurian Curry to name a few. The delivery chain also claims to use no added MSG as well as little to no oil in its dishes. You can place an order in Goregaon, Andheri, Powai, Kalina, Bandra, Khar, BKC and Lower Parel.

Kaali peeli gyan
Mumbai’s chatty taxiwallahs have their quips on life, the universe and everything and most importantly, on the moral fabric of our society.

This diarist encountered one such gent last night. He spoke at length of his hatred for Gujaratis and Marwaris and how he really prefers hanging out with Maharashtrians instead but then he hates the way they celebrate every festival in this city.

“Dahi handi originated in my native UP but we don’t celebrate it with such pomp”, he said. What caught our attention was his theory on the rich and the poor. He said that he never agrees to do anything a rich person asks him to do. Why? because the rich expect undying gratitude from him even if he agrees have a cup of tea with them.

He’d never refuse chai offered by a “gareeb aadmi” though. In the midst of his tirade on the morality of “yeh amir log”, he happened to mention another reason why he’d never be friendly with anyone who’s at a higher economical status than he is, “pata chala kal mid-day newspaper mein chhap denge.” Oops!

A neigh with words
Call it taking a turn for the laconic, or simply having a neigh with words. Whatever it is, the notice on the gates of the Mahalaxmi Race Course, leading to the track has changed.

The notice at the Mahalaxmi Race Course warning joggers and walkers about the pecking order
The notice at the Mahalaxmi Race Course warning joggers and walkers about the pecking order

Earlier, a charming and rather amusing notice used to greet regular walkers and joggers at SoBo’s green emerald. It read: ‘Walkers and Joggers beware; Horses have right of way’. Today, that has been changed to ‘Horses Have Priority’. Crisp and shorter in a no time to waste world.

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