Mumbai Diary: Saturday scene

The city — sliced, diced and served with a dash of sauce

Cops for a cause
A few women police constables from the 2004 batch contribute a donation of Rs 15,000 to Nana Patekar’s NAAM Foundation at his residence in Mahim when they dropped by to seek blessings from the Ganesh installation on Thursday evening.

The actor, along with fellow Marathi actor, Makarand Anaspure, set up this foundation to aid drought affected farmers of Maharashtra.

From Surat to Chicago
Those belonging to the Pushtimarg sect of Hinduism would be familar about the beautiful Pichvais. For the uninitiated, these are intricate textile paintings depicting scenes from Lord Krishna’s life that are usually hung behind the idol of Shrinathji.

(From left) Madhuvanti Ghose (Alsdorf Associate Curator of Indian, Southeast Asian, Himalayan, and Islamic Art), Isha Ambani, Nita M Ambani (Founder and Chairperson, Reliance Foundation) and Douglas Druick (President and Eloise W. Martin Director, Art Institute, Chicago) pose in front of the Zardozi Pichvai of Vitthaleshji (mid-17th Century, Surat, Gujarat) at the exhibition
(From left) Madhuvanti Ghose (Alsdorf Associate Curator of Indian, Southeast Asian, Himalayan, and Islamic Art), Isha Ambani, Nita M Ambani (Founder and Chairperson, Reliance Foundation) and Douglas Druick (President and Eloise W. Martin Director, Art Institute, Chicago) pose in front of the Zardozi Pichvai of Vitthaleshji (mid-17th Century, Surat, Gujarat) at the exhibition

Developed way back in the 17th Century, this traditional art form is set to leave a global imprint, thanks to its showcase at the exhibition, Gates of the Lord: the Tradition of Krishna Paintings. Sponsored by the Reliance Foundation, the exhibition is being held at the Art Institute in Chicago till January 3.

Incidentally, this exhibition on the Pushtimarg sect is first of its kind in the USA and comprises paintings from two rarely exhibited collections — the Amit Ambalal collection from Ahmedabad, and the TAPI collection, Surat. We hope Mumbaikars too get a chance to view these exhibits.

A date with the Calendar Girls
The newbie model-actresses cast in director Madhur Bhandarkar’s movie set to release next week, were spotted at the temple-replica pandal of the Golden Jubilee-celebrating Andhericha Raja at Veera Desai Road.

(Left-right) Ruhi, Satarupa, Akanksha and Kyra with Madhur Bhandarkar
(Left-right) Ruhi, Satarupa, Akanksha and Kyra with Madhur Bhandarkar

Fully clad in traditional ethnic outfits, in complying with the stringent dress code for all devotees, this was a far cry from their movie posters-banners, where they are shown posing in skimpy beachwear.

“Being debutantes, they all need Ganpati bappa’s blessings. My anxious heroines are now feeling euphoric after the Lord’s darshan,” enthused Bhandarkar who was dressed in a shagun-shawl.

How it all began
As early as 1883, eight residents of Bombay (now Mumbai) decided to form a Society to study Natural History.

Bombay Natural History Society at Hornbill House on Shahid Bhagat Singh MargBombay Natural History Society at Hornbill House on Shahid Bhagat Singh Marg

These six Englishmen and two Indians met for the first time on September 15, 1883 at the Victoria and Albert Museum (now renamed the Dr Bhau Daji Lad Museum inside the Rani Baug premises).

Together, they constituted themselves as the Bombay Natural History Society. The intention was to regularly meet and exchange notes related to natural history, exhibit interesting specimens and share ideas.

From 1883, the Society was located first on Forbes Street and later, Apollo Street. By then, there was a great need to have a museum to store the invaluable collections and treasures of the Society.

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