Mumbai: Mother's kidney liberates teen from painful ailment

The boy underwent dialysis for four years as both his kidneys failed; He had been diagnosed with a disease that doctors at Fortis Hospital, Mulund, through tests in the USA and UK, found he did not have

Rahul Thakery, an 18-year-old youngster took a flight to return to Nagpur along with his parents, leaving behind the days of a painful struggle with a four-year-old kidney ailment.

Rahul with his parents Ramakant Thakery and Manisha
Rahul with his parents Ramakant Thakery and Manisha

He was pronounced fit after his mother Manisha, donated one of her kidneys to him around three weeks back. He had been diagnosed with a disease that doctors at Fortis Hospital, Mulund, through tests in the USA and UK, found he did not have.

Rahul had a history of kidney stones from the age of six, which gradually led to kidney failure. His case was first diagnosed as oxalosis, a rare metabolic disorder that forces the patient to undergo kidney and liver transplant, and it pushed him into a four-year wait on the transplant lists of several medical institutions in the city.

He spent the entire period on dialysis. Initially doctors felt he would need kidney and liver transplants. “Despite dialysis, he managed to score a first class in Std XII.

Encouraged by the success, he even took admission for BE, computer science in July but in August we had to abandon his studies and come to Mumbai for treatment since his health deteriorated,” said Manisha.

International tests
The Thakerys are from Nagpur. Rahul’s father Ramakant had a business and his mother works with All India Radio. After they came to Mumbai, the dialysis schedule and medication completely wore Rahul out.

As the days passed doctors decided to conduct a genetic study of a biopsy at international centres, to find out more about the rare ailment. The decision proved very helpful.

“We wanted to conduct a genetic study of a biopsy of the kidneys and liver but sadly the tests aren’t done in our country. We sent Rahul’s blood samples to Mayo clinic, USA, and a liver biopsy for enzymatic study to King’s College, London.

Surprisingly, the reports suggested he may not be a type 1 oxalosis patient and hence would require only a kidney transplant,” said Dr Haresh Dodeja, Consultant Nephrologist & Transplant Physician at the Fortis hospital at Mulund.

Blood type issue
However, the struggle was yet to end as the blood type of the youngster didn’t match with those of the organ donors (from the family). That’s when his mother came forward to donate a kidney to her son.

She also belonged to ABO blood type, which was incompatible with Rahul’s (ABO). But the doctors took the risk and went ahead with the cross blood type kidney transplant.

“Manisha’s enthusiasm inspired the entire team,” said Dodeja. While the operation was performed around three weeks ago, Rahul was pronounced fit on December 31 and discharged from the hospital. “In the past one year, my husband had to quit his business and I kept traveling between Nagpur and Mumbai to handle Rahul’s situation.

It didn’t take me a second to think when I came to know that there is something that I can do to treat his ailment. Everybody, my colleagues, hospital staff and social workers helped us. It’s wonderful that it all ended in 2014. The New Year will truly bring in prosperity and well being in our family,” said Manisha.

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