Oye Fusion: The new Indian-Oriental joint in Thane

You might miss Oye Fusion as it is sandwiched in between brightly-lit eateries on Thane’s busy Gokhale Road. Once we stepped in, we noticed that the eatery was split into two levels. We settled in on the first floor (which offers a view of the road) and noticed uneven wooden strips that lined its wall creating an illusion of a skyline. The peppy Dance music lifted our spirits and we were reading for our journey into a fusion of flavours.

The Crackling Spinach Paneer dish was a well done contrast of flavours

The menu threw up a variety of North Indian and Oriental dishes. We started with Chicken Thupka Soup, a Tibetan soup with vegetables and flat noodles (R114). While we waited for it, we ordered the mocktail Naam Thai (R189) and the cocktail Bombay Masala (R219). Naam Thai, which is made using basil leaves, pineapple juice, lemonade and lemongrass, was a refreshing and healthy concoction. The Bombay Masala comprised vodka, chaat masala and lemonade and was bang for the buck.

By now, our soup had arrived. While it tasted warm and comforting like good soup should and the quantity was sufficient for two, we would have liked to bite into a few more chunks of chicken. Next, we ordered the Drunken Kebab (R249), which consisted of barbequed chunks of chicken flambéed in rum. It had a unique flavour but tasted slightly acidic. The Crackling Spinach Paneer (R209) was one our favourite picks for the evening. The Indianised Chinese dish included crisply fried spinach that tastes slightly sweet along with delish pieces of paneer tikka. The contrast of flavours made this an interesting option, and a must-try.

The Burmese Khausey (Chicken) was one of the winners. Pics/ Sameer Markande

We fused cuisines for our mains: Burmese Khausey Chicken (Rs 269), Kheema Boti (Rs 289) with Makki Roti (Rs 39) and Laccha Paratha (Rs 49). The curse of the second half overtook this meal and the attendants who had been prompt and keyed in so far vanished from sight. It felt like an eternity before they emerged with the food.

The Burmese Khausey didn't disappoint. The coconut gravy was accompanied with six toppings (including chillies, crushed roasted peanuts, fried onions, etc). We loved the subtle flavours of the gravy and the tender bites of chicken; another highlight of our evening. But then, as an anticlimax, the Kheema Boti was all bone and while the spices were bang on, we had half a mind to send the dish back. The Lachha Paratha and Makki Roti were excessively salty, which made the Kheema taste excessively salty.

Thankfully, the Gulab Jamuns (R109) was a sweet finale with its melt-in-the-mouth goodness.

At Gokhale Road, opposite Malhar Talkies, Thane (W). Call 33130729

Oye Fusion didn't know we were there. The Guide reviews anonymously and pays for meals. 

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