SA batsmen rule at WACA

A final session rich with runs put South Africa in complete control on the second day of their third and deciding Test with Australia in Perth on Saturday.

Hashim Amla
SA’s Hashim Amla tackles a rising delivery on Day Two of the third Test against Australia at the WACA in Perth on Saturday. He ended the day on 99. PIC/Getty Images

With both sides having been dismissed cheaply first up, the Proteas headed back to the crease just before tea with a lead of 62. Come stumps their card read 230 for two, an overall advantage of 292.

They helped themselves to 206 runs in the final session, with Hashim Amla walking off unbeaten on 99 while Graeme Smith (84) was only stopped on his way to a century by a brilliant catch from Nathan Lyon.

In command
The same player would drop Jacques Kallis shortly after, though, although with a lead of close to 300 already and with plenty of time on their side, South Africa would have no doubt remained in command regardless.

Their riotous session overshadowed the grand farewell of Australian batsman Ricky Ponting, although the retiring Tasmanian will probably be glad of that.
He contributed just four to a first-innings total of 163 all out which left South Africa in credit before they even started their second innings.

Rousing bowling show
It was their rousing bowling performance that gave them the platform, on a morning when fans had flocked to the WACA in anticipation of one last masterclass from the departing Ponting, but instead it was the Proteas attack who grabbed the limelight as they took eight wickets for 130.

Australia would have been in more trouble had wicketkeeper Matthew Wade not made a fluent 68. The hosts resumed on 33 for two in the morning session but David Warner fell to the first ball of the second over, aiming a swipe at Dale Steyn’s loosener to feed AB de Villiers a catch.

Vernon Philander then played the role of party pooper, Ponting tucking bat behind pad before being struck on the knee-roll after some late inswing. Asad Rauf raised the finger and Ponting’s unsuccessful use of DRS screamed of hope rather than judgement.¬†Things went from bad to worse as in-form skipper Michael Clarke (five) was undone by another brute of a ball from Steyn.

You May Like



    Leave a Reply