'Tevar' - Movie review

First-time director Amit Sharma's eye for detailing is one of the plus points of the movie. But unfortunately, the few delightful moments are overshadowed in the whole scheme of this brutally violent film

U/A; Action/Romance
Director: Amit Ravindernath Sharma
Cast: Arjun Kapoor, Sonakshi Sinha, Manoj Bajpayee
Rating: 2.5 stars

Poster of 'Tevar'
Poster of 'Tevar'

'Tevar' starts with a handicap. This remake of a 2003 Telugu film, 'Okkudu', has a jaded, well-worn story that's been repeated several times over. Now the challenge for the first-time director Amit Ravindernath Sharma and the writers was to redesign it to suit the contemporary times. But, ironically, they have not only failed to do so, but also managed to take it further back a decade or two, uncomfortably reminding us of the terrible '80s phase of Bollywood. That phase where the hero's hormones raged relentlessly and he would unofficially appoint himself as the messiah of the damsels in distress in his vicinity. He would tackle dozens of goondas single handedly (the considerate goondas would only attack one at a time, while the others would just lie around waiting patiently for their turn) to protect the impossibly coy heroine who seemed to be only able to function when accompanied by a man.

Also see: Photos: Special screening of 'Tevar'

Agra ka 'launda' Ghanshyam or Pintoo (Arjun Kapoor) is the son of a cop (Raj Babbar). He is a kabaddi enthusiast and also the chivalrous kind who goes around merrily bashing up people who dare to outrage the modesty of women in his locality. Radhika is a girl from Mathura who's being wooed rather violently by the local goonda (Manoj Bajpayee), who otherwise passed his time killing people who came in the way of his politician brother. Pintoo saves Radhika and they are now on the run.

Sharma's eye for detailing is one of the few plus points of the film. He brings Mathura, Agra and the surrounding areas alive on screen along with the area specific quirks and chaos in the daily lives of the residents. Some scenes are delightful, especially the ones which involve Pintoo's family. But unfortunately, these are just by the way in the whole scheme of this brutally violent film. The violence is in excess and each scene, action or otherwise, is stretched beyond a point of patience.

Arjun Kapoor has a heavy burden on his shoulders as he plays the macho hero, capable of almost everything, and is part of almost every scene. Still a greenhorn, the actor falters at some crucial scenes, but his sincerity and affable personality kind of makes up for it. Bajpayee, the effortlessly brilliant actor that he is, plays the baddie perfectly but unfortunately his character ends up being nothing more than a caricature in a pair of jockeys by the time we reach the climax. Sonakshi is competent but she obviously enjoys being trapped in a fragile, bharatiya nari image. So no hope there. Shruti Haasan's item number is uhm…just that.

Watch it if you miss those old '80s masala no-brainers, or if you are an Arjun Kapoor fan.

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