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Walk past Mumbai's treasures on Dr DN Road

A lot might miss the eye while rushing across the busy stretch of Dr DN Road, which starts at Crawford Market and ends at Flora Fountain. Today, on the 189th birth anniversary of Dadabhai Naoroji, the guide lists some of the architectural marvels that dot this road

Earlier known as Hornby Road, Dr Dadabhai Naoroji Road, commonly known as DN Road is a delight for an architecture lover.

The stone statue of  Dr Dadabhai Naoroji near Flora Fountain
The stone statue of Dr Dadabhai Naoroji near Flora Fountain. Pic/Bipin Kokate

From Islamic to Gothic architecture, this street offers a variety that is more than the number of ingredients involved in the bhel sold on the street.

DR DN Road
A look at DR DN Road from Flora Fountain as the vantage point. Pics/Bipin Kokate

The stretch, which begins at Crawford Market and ends at Flora Fountain, is a Grade II streetscape under the 1995 Heritage Regulations of Greater Bombay.

The Vatcha Agiary is flanked by imposing stone guardians and is easy to spot on the road. This agiary was completed in May 1910.

Vatcha Agiary
The Vatcha Agiary

JN Petit Institute and Reading Room is a treasure house for those seeking solace in the busy streets of the city. It claims to be the largest reading room in Asia and houses some rare marvels such as centuries old Shahnameh that weighs over 40kg!

JN Petit Institute and Reading Room
JN Petit Institute and Reading Room. Pic/Sameer Markande

Siddharth College has an important historic significance which is quite opposite of its Western style of Neoclassical architecture. The institute had Dr Ambedkar on its board and strived to promote education among Indians when it was established in 1946.

Siddharth College
Siddharth College

Khadi Bhandar and Village Commission is a six-decade-old landmark housed in the Jeevan Udyog building.

Khadi Bhandar and Village Commission
Khadi Bhandar and Village Commission. Pic/Atul Kamble

This shopping haven was formerly known as the Whiteway & Laidlaw department store in the pre-independence era.  Pic/Atul Kamble

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