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Will cricket's bad boys be punished for on-field spats with yellow cards?

England batsman Joe Root has backed former New Zealand skipper Martin Crowe's idea of introducing football-like yellow and red cards in cricket as punishment to curb on-field misbehaviour

London: Having been on the receiving end of Australian opener David Warner's fiery temper, England middle-order batsman Joe Root sees logic in Kiwi great Martin Crowe's call for a soccer-like card system to curb player misbehaviour.

Root on Monday said that he supported former New Zealand skipper Martin Crowe's idea of introducing yellow and red cards in cricket as a punishment for misconduct.

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"Yeah, why not? It seems that at the minute there's a lot of things that people aren't happy with, the way people are holding themselves on the field, and if that's (the card system) going to sort that out, then why not? I've not thought about it, I've not read the article or anything," Root was quoted as saying by ESPNcricinfo.

David Warner
David Warner has been involved in several on-field spats recently. File Pic/AFP

Warner's growing reputation as a hard-hitting batsman has coincided with the southpaw's increasing fondness to get involved in on-field spats, making him a regular visitor to the match referee's room.

The latest, against India's Rohit Sharma in Sunday's tri-series contest, cost him half his match fee and a reprimand from his own board, who have asked the 28-year-old "to stop looking for trouble".

"...there is a growing concern that David Warner's thuggish behaviour has gone too far," former New Zealand captain Crowe wrote in his ESPNCricinfo column.

"Soon one day, it will lead to an incident that will sully the game for good," added Crowe, convinced fines can no longer act as a deterrent.

"You have to take them out of the game for extended periods. Two yellow cards should result in a red card, which should ban any player for six months," he added.

The latest altercation comes after a series of spats between Indian and Australian cricketers during the four-match Test series.

Root, who was attacked by Warner in a Bar in Birmingham before the 2013 Ashes, says mutual respect was paramount.

"There have been a few things that have happened over the last six months and that is not good for the game. But I can't really see it going that far to lead to a punch-up. It's not ice hockey," Root was quoted as saying by 'Daily Telegraph'.

"I think someone would have to be in a really bad place to do that. You have to make sure you have respect for your opposition but still play hard cricket and play to win. It is about mutual respect for each other," he added.

When Root was asked whether he took delight from seeing Warner in trouble, given the explosive history between the pair, the Briton came up with a measured reply.

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"I'm not really that concerned about his career. I'm more concerned about England cricket. There is the odd pun and stuff that is quite funny but I think that's where it stays at," he said.

Root, however, dismissed concerns of aggression during the game getting physical and resulting in a punch-up.

"Someone would have to be in a really bad place to do that. Like I said, it's about scoring runs and taking wickets. It shouldn't really be about trying to upset the opposition. You should try and do that with the ball or bat," said Root.

"There's obviously been a few things that have happened in the last six months. That's not good for the game. But I can't see it going that far to lead to a punch. It's not ice hockey."

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