Mumbai Diary: Tuesday Dossier

Updated: 06 October, 2020 07:49 IST | Team mid-day | Mumbai

The city - sliced, diced and served with a dash of sauce.

Pic/Anurag Ahire
Pic/Anurag Ahire

Just hang in there

A kid has a field day with a little help from her guardian at a park in Jogeshwari West. Pic/Anurag Ahire

The African link

Raamesh Gowri Raghavan
Raamesh Gowri Raghavan

The Asiatic Society of Mumbai's latest series, Bombay Africana: Sidi Power on the West Coast, has an exciting topic for history buffs. It will trace the lives of the Sidi community of the African origin who arrived in India in multiple waves. "Historically, Africans have largely been pictured as victims of European colonialism and of being the dark continent. But in the Subcontinent, their stories are ones of power and enterprise. In this three-part series, we aim to open a small window into the contributions of this community who arrived often as slaves, but rose to high positions," said Raamesh Gowri Raghavan, the series coordinator.

Farewell Pushpa tai

(Second from right) Pushpa Bhave at a seminar in the college in 2014
(Second from right) Pushpa Bhave at a seminar in the college in 2014

Inspiring and feisty is how the students and colleagues of Pushpa Bhave, social activist and former HOD of the Marathi department at Ramnarain Ruia Autonomous College, remember her. Bhave, who was instrumental in several people-powered movements in the city, passed away after a prolonged illness last weekend. Professor Dr Louiza Rodrigues, HOD (History), recollected being awed by Pushpa tai's person-ality when she joined the college in 1988. "She was the kind of person who identified the best qualities in people. A daring feminist, she'd encou-rage us to stand up against injustice." Bhave's former student Dr Leena Kedare, HOD, (Marathi), reminisces how she'd go beyond books to place her teachings in the socio-political context. "I remember one time when she had raised her voice against some very influential people. She was offered protection but she refused saying, 'My students are my strength.' She was fearless. We'll miss her."

Sabka number aayega!

Sabka number aayega!

Marketing strategies and promotional activities are in overdrive, particularly across restaurants, given some of them have been shut for over six months now. While massive discounts and Indian Premier League-related offers are commonplace, one eatery in suburban Borivali is using another famous family game to enhance interaction with customers. The Burger Pit in IC Colony, an American diner that specialises in burgers and steaks, has organised an online game of Housie on Sunday, October 11, for its customers. Around 20 families will be sent Housie tickets via email and a Zoom link through which they can log in to play the game around lunch time. "We felt this is a nice way to touch base once again with our loyal patrons after this lengthy Coronavirus-forced break," the restaurant's owner Clement Fernandes told this diarist. "Food coupons will be handed out to prize winners, and I assure you, sabka number aayega," added Fernandes on a lighter note.

Sabka number aayega!

Art for heart's sake

A painting by artist Ananta Mandal for the Colours of Life art exhibition
A painting by artist Ananta Mandal for the Colours of Life art exhibition

At least 136 well-known Indian artists are showcasing 294 artworks to raise funds for cancer patients at Colours of Life, an art exhibition and sale presented by the Cancer Patients Aid Association (CPAA). Like all things these days, the annual art exhibition is online and alive till October 10. Some of the artists include Ajay De, Brinda Miller, Bina Aziz, Biswajit Mondal, Charan Sharma, Datta Bansode, Devidas Dharmadhikari and Gurcharan Singh, among others. We like how our canvas warriors are still in this annual effort to raise funds. Some temperament, some art and some heart. Cheers to that. For a dekko of these artsy pickings, check out www.cancer.org.in.

Monsoons in Mumbai, Rajabai Tower, charcoal on paper by Ajay De
Monsoons in Mumbai, Rajabai Tower, charcoal on paper by Ajay De

Modern spaces

Foy Nissen, Sir JJ School of Art, photograph, 1984. Pic/Jehangir Nicholson Art Foundation
Foy Nissen, Sir JJ School of Art, photograph, 1984. Pic/Jehangir Nicholson Art Foundation

What were the spaces that were pivotal to the growth of modern Indian art in Mumbai and who were the people behind them? The answers to these questions lie in a virtual walk called Spaces for Art that is being hosted by the Jehangir Nicholson Art Foundation (JNAF) on October 10. The second edition of the programme will be conducted by Artwalks Mumbai founders Alisha Sadikot and Nishita Zachariah. "This walk will give an insight into the way the art scene in the city was synthesised in the aftermath of Indian independence and art that reflected this vision of a new India, as well as the spaces that came up in this early period. This includes collections, early galleries, institutions, collectors and artists integral to the city," shared director Puja Vaish.

Keep scrolling to read more news

Catch up on all the latest Mumbai news, crime news, current affairs, and a complete guide from food to things to do and events across Mumbai. Also download the new mid-day Android and iOS apps to get latest updates.

Mid-Day is now on Telegram. Click here to join our channel (@middayinfomedialtd) and stay updated with the latest news

First Published: 06 October, 2020 06:22 IST

Sign up for all the latest news, top galleries and trending videos from Mid-day.com

Subscribe
loading image
This website uses cookie or similar technologies, to enhance your browsing experience and provide personalised recommendations. By continuing to use our website, you agree to our Privacy Policy and Cookie Policy. OK