'Storks' - Movie Review

Updated: Oct 10, 2016, 09:40 IST | Johnson Thomas |

'Storks' a strangely emotive world that balances fantasy with reality with animation technique that is quite kid friendly in its assay. This may not be wholesome entertainment at it's best but it's certainly cute enough to keep the little ones charmed

'Storks'
U/Animation-comedy
Directors: Nicholas Stoller, Doug Sweetland
Cast: Andy Samberg, Kelsey Grammer, Katie Crown, Jennifer Aniston, Ty Burrell, Anton Starkman, Stephen Kramer Glickman, Danny Trejo, Keegan-Michael Key, Jordan Peele
Rating: 

Animation films seem to have a life of their own and Hollywood appears to be certainly far more fascinated by the genre than it is by real time storytelling. This animated comedy under review is pretty much outlandish in it’s ideation yet it manages to hold your interest for it’s brief 89 min runtime.

Watch the trailer of 'Storks'

Storks, in this Lego movie, no longer deliver babies (and there’s an incident behind that reversal) - instead they haul packages for cornerstone.com, a retailer much like Amazon or Snapdeal.

Junior (Andy Samberg) is a super efficient stork who is on the rise up the corporate ladder of success. His mantra is the Storks’ mainstay - “Make a plan. Stick to the plan. Always deliver!” His Boss (Kelsey Grammer) sees him as management material. But for that he has to fire the only human ‘The Orphan Tulip (Katie Crown)’ on the packaging/assembly line. She is a klutz of sorts and was the product of a botched delivery years ago. Now a teenager, she tries hard to fit in, tries hard to invent ways to fly but never does manage to keep the processes flowing smoothly. Her Boss, of course, doesn’t want to take the onus of firing her on himself. So he delegates. But before Junior can do the job Tulip makes her last mistake - she processes a letter from a little boy requesting for a little brother with ninja skills for him to play with while his busy parents continue with their busy schedule. So now Junior is left handling the crisis.

The story line is interesting (even though it’s beyond believable) and as animation comedies go, it’s got enough moments written in to make things entertaining for a bit. It’s central conceit seems inspired by a randomness that is all too wacky. It’s a strangely emotive world that balances fantasy with reality with animation technique that is quite kid friendly in its assay. This may not be wholesome entertainment at it’s best but it’s certainly cute enough to keep the little ones charmed.

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