The divine taste of Sattvic food

Published: Jul 11, 2011, 06:44 IST | Surekha S

Divinetaste.com features recipes from around the world that have been modified to be minus meat, eggs, onion, garlic, and wine, in keeping with the principles of the Sattvic diet and cooking methods

Divinetaste.com features recipes from around the world that have been modified to be minus meat, eggs, onion, garlic, and wine, in keeping with the principles of the Sattvic diet and cooking methods

"The idea of starting this blog was to promote Ayurvedic food," says Anushruti RK, who created divinetaste.com, three years ago.

Anushruti's blog promotes food that is wholesome and subtle in taste, while instilling feelings of well-being within the consumer. So, you will find recipes of tarts, pastas and risottos cooked without eggs, onions, garlic and wine. The 29-year-old MBA graduate describes the food as Sattvic: an attribute of purity descried in Ayurveda.


Grilled Paneer Cheese With Roasted Artichoke, Asparagus and Bell Pepper
Salad, and Cherry Tomato Fondue


"There is a strong body-mind connect. Food that we eat affects the way we think, the way we react, and the way we relate to things," explains Anushruti.

Road to Wellness
In Ayurveda, food is described as having one of the three gunas (attributes): Sattvic (pure), Rajasic (passion/ anger) and Tamasic (darkness), according to its character and the way it affects the body. Through her blog, Anushruti hopes to help people discover the joys and calming effects of Sattvic food.

"If you add onions or garlic to a vegetable, the flavour of the vegetable is lost. Food can be just as tasty, actually even more so without the use of onions or garlic," says Anushruti, who is also a professional photographer.

Her version of the Vegetarian Biryani made without using onions or garlic is one of the most popular dishes on the site, with posts praising her version.

"A friend who is a compulsive onion lover made the Tomato Rice and Raw Jackfruit Rice using my recipe and loved it. She couldn't believe it didn't include onions, until she went back to the recipe to re-check," says Anushruti.

Anushruti's south Indian roots ensured her tryst with Ayurvedic cooking began early; her grandmother frequently used foods as medicine. "When I was suffering from a common cold, she would give me ajwain leaves with honey or soup with ginger and pepper," she recalls.

Her grandmother was also knowledgable about Ayurvedic medicines and foods. "When I went to college I began reading up on different foods based on the Vedas and their effects on the body," she shares.

High five for the healthy
Soon, she began to experiment in the kitchen and created a host of dishes in different cuisines with materials that were classified as Sattvic. Apart from a variety of tarts, cheesecakes, breads and pastas, you will also find a host of traditional dishes on her blog.

Our top five from Anushruti's kitchen:
1. Grilled Paneer Cheese With Roasted Artichoke and Asparagus and Bell Pepper Salad, and Cherry Tomato Fondue

2. Eggless Golden Yellow Cake

3. Huli/ south Indian Dal with Vegetables

4. Tomato and Cheese Tartlets with Basil Almond Pesto

5. Komola Kheer

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