Turning 30 - Movie review

Published: Jan 15, 2011, 06:32 IST | Tushar Joshi |

Dir: Alankrita Srivastava Cast: Gul Panag, Purab Kohli, Sid Makkar, Tillotama Shome, Jeneva Talwar

Turning 30
A; Romance
Dir: Alankrita Srivastava
Cast: Gul Panag, Purab Kohli, Sid Makkar, Tillotama Shome, Jeneva Talwar
Rating: *1/2



What's it about: Okay, so she's turned 30. If knowing she isn't just a 20-something wasn't bad enough, Naina (Gul Panag) has to also deal with heartbreak and losing her job. From making wedding plans and bringing in her birthday to hurling abuses and cussing her ex-boyfriend, she has quite a lot on her plate. It's difficult to describe Turning 30 as it is like a pendulum -- constantly swinging from one emotion to the other. The film also consists of a lot of unnecessary baggage, causing it to crash into one royal mess in the end.

What's hot: Naina's voiceovers and the thoughts she puts down on her laptop make a bigger impact than the actual dialogues between the characters. Between the smoking, bawling and cussing, Gul exudes moments of brilliance when she has to look vulnerable and tough at the same time. Purab Kohli is easy on the eyes and even though he's made to wear ugly scarves, his chemistry with Gul raises your interest in the plot by several levels.

What's not: Most of the dialogues are in English and mostly awkward. The script is full of stereotypes -- from the swinging boss who's partial to his lover, to a cheating husband and a lesbian couple breaking norms. The entire effort seems gimmicky. Rather than letting the characters grow on you, the director tries to hammer their stories into your head, causing one to lose interest in the proceedings. Naina's inability to come out of her break up, making her enter into a relationship on the rebound and then her efforts to eventually find herself isn't enough to fill two hours. The material is weak and sub plots unravel at their own sluggish pace, making you wonder if turning 30 is really that much of a big deal.

What to do: Watch Bridget Jones' Diary instead. It's funnier, saucier and more entertaining. Also unlike Gul Panag, Renee Zellweger isn't paralysed by a half-baked script and a weak ensemble cast.

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