In pictures: Bollywood's fixation with dysfunctional families

Updated: Mar 20, 2016, 15:34 IST
  • In pictures: Bollywood's fixation with dysfunctional families
    The movie revolves around the on-and-off bond between characters essayed by Sidharth Malhotra and Fawad Khan, who play siblings. Rajat Kapoor and Ratna Pathak Shah play their parents, while Alia Bhatt's character gets involved with the family and the brothers at different points of time. Veteran actor Rishi Kapoor plays the grandfather who wants to see his family united. Pic/Santa Banta
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  • In pictures: Bollywood's fixation with dysfunctional families
    It is a story of a dysfunctional Mehra family but it hits so close to home that it could easily be yours and mine. Father Kamal Mehra (Anil Kapoor) is a boastful, self-made, self-obsessed man, mother Neelam (Shefali Shah) is the typical suffering wife. Their spunky, smart daughter Ayesha (Priyanka Chopra) chafes and suffers under the preferential treatment doled out to the son Kabir (Ranveer Singh), who is forced to follow life path that his father has chosen for him. Then there is the pet of the family, Pluto Mehra. Ayesha is married to Manav (Rahul Bose), who is outwardly modern but belying a typical patriarchal mindset when you scratch the surface. The family lives in a 'blissfully happy' bubble till a cruise trip along with friends starts unravelling certain twisted and uncomfortable emotional knots. Pic/Santa Banta
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  • In pictures: Bollywood's fixation with dysfunctional families
    Piku's (Deepika Padukone) life revolves around her father (Amitabh Bachchan), who perpetually suffers from constipation, thus affecting her career, her moods, and also thwarting any chances of her meeting a decent man to marry. However, the crux of the story is the dichotomy as Piku is also the 'ideal' Indian daughter who in spite of knowing that her father is 'selfishly' thwarting her chances of marriage because of his fear of letting her go, doesn't really do much about it. Pic/Santa Banta
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  • In pictures: Bollywood's fixation with dysfunctional families
    Right from the opening scene Kanu Behl, director of this film, goes straight for your gut and unapologetically wrenches it out, even as he introduces you to a dysfunctional family living in Delhi. Titli, an unusual name for a boy, is the story of a family with a history of violent car-jacking. The conflict arises when the brothers prod Titli to dedicate his life to the same profession. The film explores Titli's connect with his wife, who helps him escape his dysfunctional family. Pic/Santa Banta
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  • In pictures: Bollywood's fixation with dysfunctional families
    Abhishek Bachchan plays the guitar-wielding cool dude musician Inder Bhalla, who has a passionate love-hate relationship with his parents, his once-on-now-off girlfriend Rimi (Asin) and generally with life. He's left his always warring parents (Rishi Kapoor and Supriya Pathak) to be in a foreign country. While he's struggling to make it big, he's summoned back to India with the lure of getting a share of his father's property. Pic/Santa Banta
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  • In pictures: Bollywood's fixation with dysfunctional families
    Not really a novel story at the outset, 'Crazy Cukkad Family' is about the four children of Beri family waiting for their comatose father to pop it so that they can usurp the huge property that belongs to him. What stands out in this simple, funny film is its ensemble cast. To his credit, debut director Ritesh Menon brings together some good actors best suited for the roles they are playing, thus making this film a fairly enjoyable experience. Pic/Santa Banta
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  • In pictures: Bollywood's fixation with dysfunctional families
    Naina's (Preity Zinta) father had committed suicide. Her family is dysfunctional with her mother and grandmother always at war. However, when Aman (Shah Rukh Khan) moves next door, the story changes. Aman infuses life in the overtly serious and skeptical Naina, and she falls in love with him. But Aman knows that he cannot marry Naina because of a secret he cannot divulge to her. So he intends upon setting her up with her best friend Rohit (Saif Ali Khan). Pic/TouTube
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  • In pictures: Bollywood's fixation with dysfunctional families
    The film tells the story of an Indian family that faces troubles and misunderstandings over their adopted son's marriage to a girl belonging to a lower socio-economic group than them. Directed by Karan Johar, the film features a star-studded cast of Amitabh Bachchan, Jaya Bachchan, Shah Rukh Khan, Kajol, Hrithik Roshan and Kareena Kapoor Khan. Its tagline 'It's all about loving your parents' is the film's trademark
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  • In pictures: Bollywood's fixation with dysfunctional families
    The story revolves around a father (Naseeruddin Shah) who is trying to organise a wedding for his daughter (Vasundhara Das), for whom he has arranged a marriage with a man (Parvin Dabas) she has known for only a few weeks. For this big fat Punjabi wedding, the extended family comes together from all corners of the globe and bring emotional baggage and secrets along. 'Monsoon Wedding' encapsulates the chaos that follows within the family. Pic/Santa Banta
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  • In pictures: Bollywood's fixation with dysfunctional families
    When an old Parsi widower (Ashok Kumar) decides to remarry a Parsi widow (Pearl Padamsee), it gives rises to 'Khatta Meetha' circumstances. How the two families learn to adjust with each other and come up with solutions for their problems forms the crux of the story. The multi-starrer also features Rakesh Roshan, Bindiya Goswami, David Abraham Cheulkar, Ranjit Chowdhry, Preeti Ganguly, Deven Verma, Pradeep Kumar and Iftekhar. Pic/YouTube
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About The Gallery

Bollywood has gone beyond the 'ideal' family and started portraying stories closer to reality. With 'Kapoor & Sons' releasing this week, we look at Bollywood's fixation with dysfunctional families

 

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