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Tech special: Interesting facts about Xerox machines

American multinational document management firm Xerox Corporation Ltd, unveiled the Xerox 914 on September 16th 1959. On this occasion, we look at some facts about the most successful single product that revolutionized the document-copying industry for years to come...

American multinational document management firm Xerox Corporation Ltd, unveiled the Xerox 914 on September 16th 1959. On this occasion, we look at some facts about the most successful single product that revolutionized the document-copying industry for years to come...

Xerox 914
Xerox 914

>> The Xerox 914 could make 100,000 copies per month (one copy every 26.4 seconds, or ~136 copies/hour).

>> The Xerox 914 was named because it could copy originals up to 9 inches by 14 inches (229 mm × 356 mm).

>> One major drawback of the Xerox 914 was that it had a tendency to catch fire when overheated. American political activist Ralph Nader claimed that a model in his office had caught fire three times in a four month period.

>> Because of the above-mentioned issue, the Xerox company provided a small fire extinguisher called the "scorch eliminator, along with the copier.

>> A floor-mounted device, the external design was created by James G. Balmer of Armstrong-Balmer & Associates, in collaboration with engineers Don Shepardson, John Rutkus and Hal Bogdenoff of Xerox, who had developed an engineering prototype.

>> Haloid had been renamed Haloid Xerox in 1958, and, after the instant success of the 914, when the name Xerox soon became synonymous with "copy", would become the Xerox Corporation.

>> The copier was demonstrated to the public on September 16, 1959, at the Sherry-Netherland Hotel in New York. It was shown on live television.

>> Researchers at Xerox and its Palo Alto Research Center invented several important elements of personal computing. These include the desktop metaphor GUI, the computer mouse and desktop computing. These features were earlier frowned upon by the then board of directors, who ordered the Xerox engineers to share them with Apple technicians. The features were taken on by Apple and, later, Microsoft. Partly thanks to these features, these two firms would then go on to duopolize the personal computing world.

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