Next

Movie review: 'Grace of Monaco'

'Grace of Monaco'
U/A; Drama
Director: Oliver Dahan
Cast: Nicole Kidman, Tim Roth
Rating: 

While watching 'Grace of Monaco', I had only one frustrating thought ringing in my head: who cares about this story and why am I watching this? Grace Kelly is considered as one of the most beautiful women to have graced this planet. She has appeared in three famous Alfred Hitchcock films – 'Dial M for Murder', 'Rear Window' and 'To Catch a Thief'. And then she suddenly disappeared from stardom. So how do you go about making a bad movie out of such an interesting character? Ask director Oliver Dahan and writer Arash Amel.

'Grace of Monaco' movie review
Nicole Kidman in 'Grace of Monaco'

To say that 'Grace of Monaco' is pretentious drivel is an understatement. Dahan's earlier film, 'La Vie En Rose', had the stunning Marion Cotillard, but that film had some serious melodramatic issues. In 'Grace of Monaco', he takes the period melodrama to unintentionally hilarious levels as Nicole Kidman struggles under her five kilos of makeup to make an impression. Dahan's camera literally lingers around Kidman's mouth and eyes as if to make us admire Kelly's beauty, but it just comes across as a sidey character staring at Kidman using binoculars.

Instead of being a moving biopic, 'Grace of Monaco' has only one thing to say – movie stars are pretty but messed up in their heads. We’re introduced to Kelly looking into a reflection to establish the dual nature of her character. That is as subtle as the filmmaking gets, and it follows a painfully dull love story along with some ham-handed attempts at shoehorning historical events. None of those things focus on the one thing that Grace Kelly fans actually want to see – the contrasting nature between her acting career and the post retirement palatial one.

And if you're looking for details of Grace Kelly's life that aren't already on her Wiki page, 'Grace of Monaco' will definitely annoy you. Worse, the film literally holds up cue cards to specify the emotional notes playing in every single plot point, the last of which is regret, something that one feels after watching this movie.

0 Views

You May Like

0 Comments

    Leave a Reply