Mumbai: Term half over, yet law admissions continue

The centralised admission process has thrown things out of gear, say principals. Representational picture
The centralised admission process has thrown things out of gear, say principals. Representational picture

Even though law is one of the most popular degrees, city colleges are running up a high number of vacant seats for the course, thanks to the chaotic centralised admission process. Apart from a few top colleges, many have a significant number of seats vacant. And, until last year, these colleges did not have a single vacant seat.

All other degree courses are starting their new semester, but law admissions are still going on. Candidates are applying to colleges where there is no vacancy, while colleges with vacant seats go unnoticed. That's because the Common Entrance Test (CET) Cell did not declare the vacancy list before the beginning of the final round. Of the 60 seats at Rajashree Shahu Law College, 12 are vacant. There are 18 vacancies at St Wilfred Law College, 29 at Manjra Charitable Trust Law College, 39 in Vishwagurukul Law College and so on.

Principal of Manjra Charitable Trust Law College, Airoli, UK Nambiar, said, "We are halfway through the academic year and we are worried about completing the syllabus. But, there are too many seats going vacant for us to begin classes."

Abhishek Jain, principal of St Wilfred College of Law, Panvel, said, "The centralised process is a welcome move, but this was started too late and was hit by one problem after another." Sachin Pawar, President of Student Law Council, said, "While students are looking for seats, they have no idea where the vacancies are."
Commissioner of the CET Cell Chandrashekhar Oak was not available for comment.

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