Then and now: You won't believe how Mumbai has changed over the years!

Nov 11, 2018, 17:30 IST
  • Then and now: You won't believe how Mumbai has changed over the years!

    Apollo Bunder: Now known as Wellington Pier, was an important pier for embarkation and disembarkation of passengers and goods into Bombay (now Mumbai). Located at Gateway of India, the only passengers using it now are those taking a ferry to Elephanta Island. The original name, Apollo Bunder was derived from the Palla fish that was sold from this port in the olden times. This word was then changed to Pollem by the Portugese and to Apollo by the English. The Gateway of India was built at this pier to commemorate the arrival of King George V and Queen Mary

    1/38
  • Then and now: You won't believe how Mumbai has changed over the years!

    Apollo Bunder today: Still called Apollo bunder by many, this pier is largely used by people taking a boat ride to Elephanta caves, Uran and other islands near the city 

    2/38
  • Then and now: You won't believe how Mumbai has changed over the years!

    Army Navy building: An iconic landmark in South Mumbai known for its fine mid-19th-century neo-classical facade, this building was originally used as a British army navy store and stands next to the David Sasson Library and Watson’s Hotel also known as Esplanade Mansion.

    3/38
  • Then and now: You won't believe how Mumbai has changed over the years!

    Army Navy building today: The beautiful structure serves as the home to a number of commercial offices

    4/38
  • Then and now: You won't believe how Mumbai has changed over the years!

    Bombay fort: In the 16th century AD, Bombay was an archipelago of seven marshy islands which were leased by the King of Portugal, to his compatriot Garcia de Orta, a famous botanist-physician in 1548. He built a wooden structure called Manor House, which was the first modern construction in Bombay. When built, the area around the Manor House had a seafront wall with four guns mounted on it. It soon came to be known as Castle Barracks. The British became the masters of the islands of Bombay when the Portuguese gave them the Barracks in dowry to King Charles II after he married Catherine of Braganza, of Portugal. The Manor House officially became the seat of power of the British Empire in 1665

    5/38
  • Then and now: You won't believe how Mumbai has changed over the years!

    Bombay Fort today: The re-built Manor House in INS Angre, today, is the seat of the Flag Officer Commanding-in-Chief, Western Naval Command. Image source/ Indian Navy site

    6/38
  • Then and now: You won't believe how Mumbai has changed over the years!

    Bombay Gymkhana: Established in 1875, is one of the premiere gymkhanas in Mumbai. Bombay Gymkhana Rugby Club (rugby union) are tenants. Located in South Mumbai, the structure was originally built as a British-only club, designed by English architect, Claude Batley. The Gymkhana Grounds lie in the southern end of the Azad Maidan and is on leased property. It is boxed in by a shortcut lane which connects Churchgate to Victoria Terminus.

    7/38
  • Then and now: You won't believe how Mumbai has changed over the years!

    Bombay Gymkhana today: Currently the Bombay Gymkhana is embroiled in a road widening row where the latter wants a part of the gymkhana's land in order to widen the adjacent Hazarimal Somani Marg from 50 feet to 80 feet and required about 6000 feet of land from the Bombay Gymkhana

    8/38
  • Then and now: You won't believe how Mumbai has changed over the years!

    Mumbai Central: The Colaba-Ballard Pier Railway Station became insufficient to meet the demands of the growing population in Mumbai; this led the government to make plans for the construction of Bombay Central. The present suburban route that once ran till Colaba was earlier called Bellasis Road station. It was renamed Bombay Central (local) after the construction of the long distance Bombay Central Terminus (BCT) on the eastern side

    9/38
  • Then and now: You won't believe how Mumbai has changed over the years!

    Mumbai central today: Designed by British architect Claude Batley, Mumbai Central serves as a major stop for both local and inter-city and express trains. Trains depart from the station connecting various destinations mostly across states in the northern, western and north-western parts of India

    10/38
  • Then and now: You won't believe how Mumbai has changed over the years!

    Colaba Causeway: Constructed by the British East India Company during the tenure of Sir Robert Grant (1779–1838) as the governor of Bombay (1835–1838), Colaba Causeway was completed in 1838, by using a part of the Old Woman’s Island. This led to the last two islands of Bombay being connected to the mainland of the city

    11/38
  • Then and now: You won't believe how Mumbai has changed over the years!

    Colaba Causeway today: Officially known as the Shahid Bhagat Singh Road, this place has an irresistible charm. A shopper’s paradise and surrounded by some of Mumbai’s landmarks such as The Gateway of India, Regal Cinema, The Taj Mahal Palace and Tower, Cuffe Parade and the Fort area, Colaba Causeway is a place that no tourist wants to miss

    12/38
  • Then and now: You won't believe how Mumbai has changed over the years!

    Colaba: The name Colaba comes from Kolabhat, a name given by Kolis, the indigenous inhabitants of the islands, before the arrival of the Portuguese. The area that is now Colaba was originally a region consisting of two islands: Colaba and Little Colaba (or Old Woman's Island). The Portuguese had acquired these lands from the Sultanate of Cambay by the Treaty of Bassein (1534). The group of islands was given by Portugal to Charles II of England as a dowry when he married Catherine of Braganza

    13/38
  • Then and now: You won't believe how Mumbai has changed over the years!

    Colaba today: With the Gateway of India and the art deco style Regal theatre located around the area,  Colaba makes for the perfect home for modern cafes (Café Mondegar, Royal and Leopold Cafe), the Taj Mahal Palace and Tower hotel, Bademiya Restaurant, Bagdadi restaurant. The southern tip is occupied by a military cantonment, including the large Navy Nagar layout built on reclaimed land known as Holiday Camp. The older parts of the cantonment retains its large, wooded spaces and is the only bit of green left in this otherwise congested area. In the midst of Navy Nagar lies the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR), one of India's leading scientific institutions

    14/38
  • Then and now: You won't believe how Mumbai has changed over the years!

    BMC Building: The BMC was created in 1865 and Arthur Crawford was its first Municipal Commissioner. The Municipality was initially housed in a modest building at the terminus of Girgaum Road. In 1870, it was shifted to a building on the Esplanade, located between Watson Hotel and the Sassoon Mechanics Institute where the present Army & Navy building is situated. On December 9, 1884, the foundation stone for the new building of the Bombay Municipal Corporation was laid opposite to the Victoria Terminus by the Viceroy of the time, Lord Ripon. During the construction of the building, two designs were considered; one with a Gothic designs done by Frederick William Stevens and the other in a Indo-Saracenic design presented by Robert Fellowes Chisholm. The Gothic design was finally selected. The building was completed in 1893

    15/38
  • Then and now: You won't believe how Mumbai has changed over the years!

    BMC building today: As the name suggests, the building houses the civic body that governs the city of Mumbai, which is now named the Brihanmumbai Mahanagar Palika

    16/38
  • Then and now: You won't believe how Mumbai has changed over the years!

    Elphinstone circle: Elphinstone Circle was laid out in 1869 on the site of the old Bombay Green in Fort area of the city. The buildings were designed by James Scott as part of the redevelopment of Bombay which began under the Governorship of Sir Bartle Frere in the 1860s. Following Independence, the Circle was renamed Horniman Circle. This name refers to Benjamin Horniman, an English journalist

    17/38
  • Then and now: You won't believe how Mumbai has changed over the years!

    The Horniman Circle Garden today: Is a large park in South Mumbai, which encompasses an area of 12,081 square yards (10,101 m2).  Surrounded by office complexes housing the country's premier banks, this area was designed to be a large open space with grand buildings in the middle of the walled city

    18/38
  • Then and now: You won't believe how Mumbai has changed over the years!

    David Sasson library: The European employees working in the Government Mint and Dockyard in Mumbai started the Mechanics' Institution in 1847 to provide technical education to adults and to hold lectures. They worked out of rented premises until they moved to their own building thanks to the generosity of Sir David Sassoon. The building was called the David Sassoon Library and Reading Room. The idea for a library to be situated in the centre of the city was the brainchild of Albert Sassoon, son of the famous Baghdadi Jewish philanthropist, David Sassoon. The building was designed by architects J. Campbell and G. E. Gosling, for the Scott McClelland and Company, at a cost of Rs. 125,000. David Sassoon donated Rs. 60,000, while the rest was borne by the Government of Bombay Presidency

    19/38
  • Then and now: You won't believe how Mumbai has changed over the years!

    David Sasson library today: Is used to house several commercial complexes

    20/38
  • Then and now: You won't believe how Mumbai has changed over the years!

    Gateway of India: The objective behind the construction of the Gateway of India was to commemorate the visit of King George V and Queen Mary to Bombay (Mumbai). In March 1911, Sir George Sydenham Clarke, who was then the Governor of Bombay, laid down the monument’s first foundation. The architectural design of Gateway of India was George Wittet

    21/38
  • Then and now: You won't believe how Mumbai has changed over the years!

    Gateway of India today: While it is widely used for people taking ferries to adjoining islands the Gateway of India is also a hot spot for tourists. With one side of the monument encompassed by the sea, the other side boasts of the grand Taj Mahal Hotel

    22/38
  • Then and now: You won't believe how Mumbai has changed over the years!

    Girgaun-Chowpatty: When broken down, the word Chau-pati translates to four channels or four creeks as per. This name is analogous to that of Satpaty, a village in the Mahim Taluka of the Thane District, which is approached through a Channel or Creek, containing seven divisions of water

    23/38
  • Then and now: You won't believe how Mumbai has changed over the years!

    Girgaon-Chowpatty today: The beach is noted for its Ganesh Visarjan celebrations when thousands of people from all over Mumbai and Pune come to immerse the idols of Lord Ganesh in the Arabian Sea. It is also one of the many places in the city where the 'RAMLILA' is performed on a stage every year. Also a haven for chat lovers, there are several hawkers on the beach, selling bhelpuri, panipuri, ragda patties and pav bhaji

    24/38
  • Then and now: You won't believe how Mumbai has changed over the years!

    Kala Ghoda: The name Kala Ghoda means Black Horse, a reference to the presence of a black stone statue of King Edward VII (as the then Prince of Wales) mounted on a horse that was built by Jewish businessman and philanthropist Albert Abdullah David Sassoon. This statue was removed from the precinct in 1965 and subsequently placed inside the Byculla Zoo. In 2017, the 'Kala Ghoda' returned to the area with a new statue of a similar looking horse without a rider, being commissioned by the Kala Ghoda Association. The statue, titled 'Spirit of Kala Ghoda' was designed by architect Alfaz Miller and sculpted by Shreehari Bhosle

    25/38
  • Then and now: You won't believe how Mumbai has changed over the years!

    Kala Ghoda today: It has a large number of the city's heritage buildings, museums, art galleries and educational institutions surrounding it. Iconic structures like the Jehangir Art Gallery, the National Gallery of Modern Art, the Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya and The Arts Trust are present nearby. The area is sandwiched between Mumbai Port's docklands to the east, Regal Cinema to the south, Fountain to the north and Oval Maidan to the west

    26/38
  • Then and now: You won't believe how Mumbai has changed over the years!

    Khada Parsi: Manockjee Cursetjee was a Parsi businessman and judge from Bombay, remembered as a reformer and proponent of female education, Cursetjee set up a public monument, now known as the "Khada Parsi", to commemorate his father

    27/38
  • Then and now: You won't believe how Mumbai has changed over the years!

    Khada Parsi today: The 'Khada Parsi' has gone through a number of renovation and restoration work and is currently located between two flyovers in Byculla

    28/38
  • Then and now: You won't believe how Mumbai has changed over the years!

    Sewri: Pronounced 'Shivdi', this area was a small hamlet on the eastern shore of the Parel island. Sewri has a fort that dates back to 1770 and a garden established by the Agri-Horticultural Society which was acquired in 1865 by Arthur Crawford, then the Municipal Commissioner of Bombay, for building a European cemetery

    29/38
  • Then and now: You won't believe how Mumbai has changed over the years!

    Sewri today: Large parts of Sewri belong to the Bombay Port Trust and were turned into the harbour facilities. In 1996, the mangrove swamps of Sewri were declared a protected ecology. Flamingoes from other parts of India come to these mangroves to breed and arrive at the mudflats from the months of October to March every year. Sewri East also houses a number of industrial units especially those of Petrochemical industries

    30/38
  • Then and now: You won't believe how Mumbai has changed over the years!

    Taj Mahal Palace: Jamsetji Nusserwanji Tata, founder of the Tata Group, opened the Taj Mahal Palace, a hotel in Mumbai overlooking the Arabian Sea, on 16 December 1903. It was the first Taj property and the first Taj hotel. There are several anecdotal stories about why Tata opened the hotel and according to one story, he decided to open the hotel after an incident involving racial discrimination at the Watson's Hotel in Mumbai, where he was refused entry as the hotel permitted only Europeans

    31/38
  • Then and now: You won't believe how Mumbai has changed over the years!

    Taj Mahal Palace today: The Taj Mahal hotel is a hub for the rich and famous including foreigners. The hotel was hit by terrorists in the year 2009, and the episode had left the facade of the iconic structure scarred and battered, but the iconic hotel has bounced back from the incident and regained its former glory

    32/38
  • Then and now: You won't believe how Mumbai has changed over the years!

    Town Hall: One of the most majestic structures among the other heritage buildings in the city of Mumbai. One can say that this building represents one of the last architectural remnants of the Victorian Bombay (Mumbai). The Town hall was colloquially called as 'Tondal' during the 19th century

    33/38
  • Then and now: You won't believe how Mumbai has changed over the years!

    Town Hall today: The Town Hall houses the 'Asiatic society of Bombay' (Mumbai), which is a public state library in the city. For this reason, the structure is considered a storehouse of information

    34/38
  • Then and now: You won't believe how Mumbai has changed over the years!

    Victoria Terminus station: Before the construction of the terminus, the area was used as a warehouse that was used to store goods imported and exported from Mumbai. Originally known as Bori Bandar, the name of the tract of land was derived from two words - Bori and Bandar. Bori means sack and Bandar means port or haven (in Marathi). In 1853, the Great Indian Peninsula Railway built its railway terminus on the tract of land where the warehouse stood. Based on the location, the station was named as Bori Bunder railway station. On 16 April 1853 the Great Indian Peninsula Railway operated the first passenger train in India from Bori Bunder to Thane covering a distance of 34 km (21 mi). The time taken by the train to complete its journey from Bori Bunder railway station to Thane was fifty-seven minutes. The station was then rebuilt as the Victoria Terminus, named after the then reigning Queen Victoria. The station was designed by the consulting British architect Frederick William Stevens (1848–1900). Work began in 1878. He received US dollar 24,000 as the payment for his services

    35/38
  • Then and now: You won't believe how Mumbai has changed over the years!

    Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus today: The station is the hub of activity with several local as well as outstation trains arriving and departing from here. The monument also houses the offices of the Central Railways and is absolutely stunning on the inside. Currently the state government is looking to convert the office part of the structure into a museum

    36/38
  • Then and now: You won't believe how Mumbai has changed over the years!

    Worli sea face: Running along the shoreline of Mumbai, this was a picturesque part of the island city

    37/38
  • Then and now: You won't believe how Mumbai has changed over the years!

    Worli Sea face today: Upgraded to house a number of commercial and office complexes, Worli sea face has now become a bustling hub of activity. With wide roads and smooth walkways, this spot is home to a number of fitness enthusiasts, hawkers and tourists

    38/38
  • loading...

About The Gallery

Mumbai or Bombay as it was originally known, has a glorious past, but you wouldn't know that with skyscrapers and constant expansion going on around the city. Here are some stunning images of Bombay and what those places look like now

 

DISCLAIMER: mid-day and its affiliates shall have no liability for any views, thoughts and comments expressed on this article.

 

This website uses cookie or similar technologies, to enhance your browsing experience and provide personalised recommendations. By continuing to use our website, you agree to our Privacy Policy and Cookie Policy. OK