Movie review: MYOHO

And this film helps a lot in putting forward their Buddhist theory. Clearly made with a sincere script in hand, the project undertakes an unmistakable linear direction but it somehow lacks finesse. Simply put, MYOHO could have been way better than it eventually turned out to be. After all, it had something new to say.


Written and directed by Ranjan Shandilya, the story juxtaposes some fictional events leading up to Bihar’s earthquake of 1934 with some moving towards Mumbai’s 26/11 tragedy. Set against such historical conjectures in place, double roles carry the narration to a higher level.

Surprisingly enough, all the characters stay within their graphs and avoid hamming. As the sequences roll by, the closure becomes apparent. However, the bottomline remains that each one of them pay for what they did in their past lives. What goes around apparently doesn’t always fool around as it comes right back.

If one forgives the rather amateurish approach in terms of technicalities in some scenes, the overall movie indeed manages to create an enjoyable yarn. A few dialogues here and there makes you want to facepalm while others command goosebumps.

Divided between two worlds that betray two totally different eras rustic as well as urban India each of the protagonists have something concrete to offer on either side of the timeline. Although almost all the actors are convincing, Anil Mange seems like the real find due to his remarkable countenance.

In conclusion, this particular socio-drama is a testament to the fact that good intentions don’t always translate to good filmmaking. One can’t afford to compromise on some unwritten rules of art direction. Having said that, MYOHO definitely has one of the finest original tales to share in recent memory and some thoughtful moments to spare too.

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