Mumbai Diary: Friday frolics

Dec 26, 2014, 01:28 IST | Clayton Murzello, Hemal Ashar, Vidya Heble

The city — sliced, diced and served with a dash of sauce

Swachh Abhiyan with a difference
With the Swachh Bharat Abhiyan sweeping through the city, both literally and metaphorically, the Advertising Standards Council of India (ASCI), the body that regulates advertising, has decided to clean up ad acts. Yesterday, the ASCI took a leaf out of the Swachh book, or a straw out of its broom, so to speak. ASCI observed National Consumer day by launching a Swachh Ads Abhiyan. The campaign spanned different  platforms like Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and YouTube, and ASCI said it helped them reach people to make them aware of certain advertisements with  misleading content. They also said it helped them tell consumers that they have a right to complain if they think a particular ad makes too-tall-to-believe claims or false claims. Narendra Ambwani, chairman, ASCI, says “It is important that the consumers don’t blindly believe in advertisements and understand unethical and misleading claims.” More power to Swachh Ads Abhiyan; may those brooms clean up the corridors of ads with inflated claims.

Sunil Gavaskar and Ajit Wadekar
The right notes: Sunil Gavaskar takes the mike while Ajit  Wadekar looks on. Pic/Atul Kamble

Sunny belts out calypso; teammates on song too
Like they did so very often in the 1960s and 1970s, Dadar Union Sporting Club walked away with honours yesterday.
First, they beat traditional rivals Shivaji Park Gymkhana in a 10-over-a-side festival cricket match — the first of its kind organised by former Dadar Union captain Dilip Vengsarkar at the Union’s ground in Matunga. In the afternoon, on the fourth floor of the Matunga Gymkhana, Dadar Union’s erstwhile stalwarts — Sanjay Manjrekar, Urmikant Modi, Sridhar Mandle — had everyone’s feet tapping and hands clapping as they belted out old Hindi hits on the invitation of singer Vinay Mandke. Manjrekar, a huge Kishore Kumar fan, sang with the Versatile Vinay too. That was before Sunil Gavaskar got into the act by singing a calypso — a less famous one than Gavaskar – The real master which Lord Relator composed following his memorable debut series in the West Indies during the 1970-71 season. It went like this:

Wadekar chale aage aage...
Sobers going behind...
Kanhai drinking white rum...
Durrani drinking wine...

Wadekar chale aage aage...
Sobers going behind...
The great India bowler Abid Ali...
He got Fredericks caught in the gully...

Wadekar chale aage aage...
Sobers going behind...
The left hand spinner Bishan Singh Bedi...
He showed West Indies they are not ready...

Wadekar chale aage aage...
Sobers going behind...
The off-spinner Sri Venkat...
He showed West Indies...
They can’t bat...

Wadekar chale aage aage...
Sobers going behind...
 
Shivaji Park Gymkhana great Padmakar Shivalkar got wholesome applause while Vinod Raghavan (Dadar Union) pleasantly surprised everyone, including Mandke, with his melodious voice. Both these teams have contributed a great deal to Mumbai cricket and only a very few of the stalwarts couldn’t turn up for this inaugural event spearheaded by Vengsarkar.  Madhav Apte, the former Test batsman, did the honours by tossing for rival captains Vasu Paranjape and Wadekar. Quite appropriately, the winners’ trophy was handed over to Paranjape by former India wicketkeeper Chandrakant Patankar (84), the seniormost cricketer present at the event.

boxers shorts
Not this: These are boxers

The brief about Boxing Day
Now that Christmas is behind us and you can hear the clip-clop of reindeer hooves getting fainter as Santa makes his way back to the North Pole, we mark Boxing Day today. Wikipedia (our quick, contemporary get your knowledge fix) says that the exact etymology of Boxing Day is not very clear, but it most probably originated from the fact that in Britain it was a custom for trades people to collect “Christmas boxes” of money or presents on the first weekday after Christmas as thanks for good service throughout the year. That’s how it was called Boxing Day, though there are other theories that abound. Just to make it clear though, that it has nothing to do with the sport of boxing like some people believe. One has even overheard Mumbaikars saying it is ‘Boxers Day’. “Yaar aaj toh Boxers Day hai,”  has been heard. Not boxers, boxing. The world is a weird place and becoming increasingly so, but we have not yet reached that stage when we have a day dedicated to underwear. Not yet, anyway!

This Button is coming undone!

Speaking of ads, a print campaign currently seen in some newspapers is raising hackles, at least among the business community. The ad includes a cartoon drawing of a man who is supposed to represent a baniya or shopkeeper. But the drawing shows him wearing slovenly shorts, his belly button visible. (Cleverly, the belly button forms the dot in the website address.) However, as a colleague pointed out, baniyas are generally well turned out, and usually wear a dhoti (and never sloppy shorts). Missed representation, we say!

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