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Mumbai Diary page: Monday Musings

The city — sliced, diced and served with a dash of sauce

Hang out, a new way
Politicians may have given hanging a bad name when it’s associated with chilling out, but here’s another definition that combines fun with what looks like some serious exercise.

The Dadar-based Sitara Dance Studio is hosting what it calls Mumbai’s first aerial movement festival, called Airplay, on May 17 and 18, from noon to 10pm.

It showcases the fascinating aerial dance where performers use ropes, harnesses and slacklines to make full use of all three dimensions. It’s designed to sweep you off your feet, literally.

No toilet block for mayor
During his on-site checking of road repairs on Friday night, Mayor Sunil Prabhu got down and dirty, practically speaking.

On his way to one such site at VN Purav Marg in Chembur, Prabhu decided to be one with the people and use the public toilet in the area.

Not so much because nature called, but more because he wanted to do a spot check of the toilet’s cleanliness and functioning. It was a photo op, and we guess we should be grateful the cameras did not follow him right into the cubicle!

Different course at the races
The clip clop of hooves replaced by the rustle of paper, sighs of disappointment and elated mutterings, plus shouts of Housie! Expect that scene at the Royal Western India Turf Club (Mahalaxmi) Hooves Club House on Mondays, today and May 26.

The Hooves, tucked away in a corner of the sprawling property will host Housie from 6 pm onwards at a cost of Rs 100 for guests and members will be allowed entry with ID proof only.

One hears that prizes are attractive. Meanwhile, one thinks there will certainly be a difference. From cheering for horses, “c’mon No 5, c’mon No 11, c’mon Rising Hope” or whatever the horses names, to shouting “shake it up”, the common Housie murmur of encouragement, would be different.

Meanwhile, we say get the Housie house buzzing on Monday evening players. Zing it up by shouting Housie! And shouting yourself ‘horse’ of course.

Nurturing tomorrow’s champions?
At a nondescript location in Lalbaug, future likely champions in fencing, kabaddi, kick-boxing, choi kwang do and athletics are being nurtured.

Children under 16 get sports training. Pic/Ronak Savla
Children under 16 get sports training. Pic/Ronak Savla

Samir Raut, a sports social worker, trains and coaches more than 100 children from Byculla, Parel, Dadar and Matunga, most of whom are from domestic worker and labourer families.

In the last 15 years, Raut has mentored 140 state and 75 national players in various sports. Currently, he is training students under 16 years at Sai Baba Muncipal Ground at Parel, and the upcoming Asian Youth Championships will see four of Raut’s protegees competing.

For the parents, the fee of Rs 50 per month per sport does not seem too steep, considering the heights to which the Shree Sai Samarth Athletics Sports Centre is taking their children.

Sari, we’re showing support
We have heard of wearing one’s heart on one’s sleeve, and it must be said that during the current election campaign we have seen political symbols, messages and portraits on all sorts of garment parts, not including sleeves.

Pic/Shilpi Sampad
Pic/Shilpi Sampad

This designer sari however could well take the cake, or maybe the dhokla, as it features a portrait of Bharatiya Janata Party leader Narendra Modi on the pallu.

We’ve spotted it in a showroom but we haven’t yet heard about anyone daring and dashing enough to actually wear it. Picturing it draped on a statuesque model, we wonder how it will work in practicality.

For best effect, the pallu will have to swing free, blowing in the breeze. But what if the person who wears this number is a purer-than-pure Bharatiya naari and insists on covering her head or shoulders with the business end of the sari?

That picture could look a little weird, perhaps.

Contributed by: Hemal Ashar, Maleeva Rebello, Shilpi Sampad, Dimple Bhavsar, Vidya Heble

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