Prize catch

Renowned British silversmith Richard Fox tells MiD DAY preparing the Indian Grand Prix trophies was quite a challenge for his team

Going in circles on a state-of-the-art racetrack at lightning fast speeds is no doubt exciting, but in the end winning is the only thing. So, whoever finishes top of the podium at the 2011 Formula 1 Airtel Grand Prix of India, will have many reasons to cherish the moment. One of them, of course, would be lifting the special trophy that has been crafted for the event.

Hard work pays: Richard Fox, who has been designing trophies for such
events for the last 25 years, said he and his team have tried to combine
culture with modern technology of India. It took them five weeks to
make the trophies. file pIC

The trophies to be presented at the Indian GP on October 30 are made-in-UK but are completely Indian in look. The maker of the trophies has made sure to feature symbols which are very Indian to the core. Designed by renowned British silversmith Richard Fox, the F1 trophy is a creative representation of the Formula One style and rich design detailing that is synonymous with the country's culture. "I have made so many trophies but making a Formula One trophy for India was an honour. India is a very graceful and powerful country, so I have tried to combine culture with modern technology of India. It took us five weeks to make the trophies," Fox told MiD DAY from London.

25-year experience
Each one of the four trophies - three drivers' and one constructor's - has been handcrafted by Fox, who has been designing trophies for motor racing and other sports for the past 25 years. It was not an easy task for the team to design an Indian trophy. A group of 10 craftsmen worked almost five weeks to study about India and to incorporate it in the half-a-metre high and eight-kg heavy trophy.

"The design of the Indian Grand Prix trophy represents various elements abstracted from iconic references to India - its heritage and advancing technology. The trophy is finished in highly polished 24 carat gold and silver plate. The cup represents the domes of Hindu temples and the Taj Mahal with eleven repetitive elements, signifying the auspiciousness and importance of the number in Indian culture.

The cup is supported upon a gear or cog like form which has been created by computer technology. The ends of the cogs are shaped to represent lotus petals. The red colour representing title sponsor Airtel is encapsulated between gilded laurels signifying victory," Fox said. On the side of the trophy's title inscription are three coloured rings in saffron, white and green representing India's tricolour. The base is made of black polyacetal with the F1 logo on the underside.

'it's a waste of money'
Former sprint queen PT Usha says hosting the Indian Grand Prix is nothing but a waste of money. "I feel very bad because such hi-fi business has nothing to do with 99% of Indians. It is a criminal waste (of money). First, Twenty20 cricket spoiled the spirit of Indian sports, and now here comes another avatar which will mostly attract corporate money, who (Corporate) rarely spend for sports promotion. Only God can save the Indian sports," Usha said.

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