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Walk softly, MHADA tells residents of dilapidated buildings

If you are still living in a MHADA-owned (Maharashtra Housing And Development Authority) building that has been declared as dilapidated and unsafe, the state body will henceforth not allow you to dance with joy inside your house, invite too many people over for dinner or, in their own words “put undue pressure on the structure”.


The residents of MHADA-owned buildings are unhappy about the notice issued to them. Pic/Shadab Khan

A notice issued to MHADA apartment residents across Mumbai, categorically mentions that residents of dilapidated buildings shouldn’t hold any functions in their buildings. Residents of dilapidated structures are supposed to move to transit camps this monsoon, but many families have refused to follow MHADA’s instructions.

MHADA’s argument is that if a building is dilapidated and if the burden on the building increases, an untoward incident may take place. Speaking to SUNDAY MiD DAY, Ramesh Surwade, the deputy chief officer, MHADA’s Repair and Reconstruction Board, said, “These buildings are weak and if a function is held, the number of people would increase, thus resulting in extra burden on the building. This wouldn’t be good for the building.”

MHADA carries out a pre-monsoon survey every year, during which it examines all its 16,000 old buildings in South Mumbai and comes out with a list of the most dangerous buildings among them. This year it has listed 16 buildings as “most dangerous”.

While MHADA claims that most of the residents have accepted their proposal to shift to transit camps, some families have stayed put despite warnings. Those who have behind sounded angry on receiving the notice. “We are not aware of any such rule, and we do not feel our building is dangerous to reside in,” said Mohammad Aamir, a resident of Kanchwala Building at Duncan Road which has been declared as dilapidated. 

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