E-paper
  • Paromita Vohra: The Rules

    Paromita Vohra: The Rules

    Recently, the highly ranked Hindu College, in Delhi University, started a women's hostel. Everyone cheered and few asked why it took the 117-year-old college so long. After all, why single it out? This is the story in so many colleges even in the big cities of India

  • Paromita Vohra: And the Revolution

    Paromita Vohra: And the Revolution

    Imagine you’re 14 and already suffering supercilious man-o-logues from IIT-bound boys, about the technical greatness of Pink Floyd

  • Paromita Vohra: My name is Paromita and I am not a Bengali

    Paromita Vohra: My name is Paromita and I am not a Bengali

    Ever since I can remember, introducing myself has been torture. First, it was only the Bengalis. As soon as I said, "I'm Paromita," a tidal wave of Bengali would rush at me. Gritting my teeth, I'd say I am not Bengali

  • Paromita Vohra: Gender vendor

    Paromita Vohra: Gender vendor

    To see R Balki's Ka and Ki is to see a gigantic missed opportunity, both politically and artistically, but also, to see that these two ambitions — the political and the creative — are intertwined. Both require the power to reimagine forms, social or artistic, with genuine insight

  • Paromita Vohra: The loneliness of the cricket un-lover

    Paromita Vohra: The loneliness of the cricket un-lover

    Last year, sick on a weekend, feeling sorry for myself, I called two of my friends and demanded they come see me with flowers and chocolate. We ate our sweets, gossiped and had a convivial time. Then, one of them became pensive. "What is it?" I asked

  • Paromita Vohra: Son preference

    Paromita Vohra: Son preference

    As with notions of the nation, so with feelings about family, popular cinema is often the place where new, still-forming ideas are reflected, emotionally managed and normalised.

  • Paromita Vohra: Weekly app review

    Paromita Vohra: Weekly app review

    When I was a kid, if one acted too fancy or wrinkled one’s nose at desi things, like, for instance, saying, "I don’t want parathas for tiffin! I want sandwiches!" (or called tiffin, the lunchbox), one of your formidable maasis or buas would snort, "angrez chale gaye, aulad chhod gaye."

  • Paromita Vohra: Paper cuts

    Paromita Vohra: Paper cuts

    If you see Vijay Mallya, please tell him I’m looking for him, yaar. I need his help.

  • Paromita Vohra: A march this March

    Paromita Vohra: A march this March

    I’ve been grinning often while checking out my social media newsfeed. What’s making me grin? Posters I see for a march on March 8, International Working Women’s Day, in Delhi, from a growing group of university women, organising under the name Pinjra Tod. 

  • Paromita Vohra: The daily soap news

    Paromita Vohra: The daily soap news

    We are a country addicted to soap operas and the daily soap is, arguably, the most influential narrative form of this century for India

  • Paromita Vohra: A reason for rhyme

    Paromita Vohra: A reason for rhyme

    The Rajasthan government has removed all Western poems and Urdu words from its school text books. 

  • Paromita Vohra: Why not so serious?

    Paromita Vohra: Why not so serious?

    Things people say to you, when you mention harassment, even liberal types, who care for the poor, for women’s issues and prefer to say Bombay, not Mumbai, are often variations of — why so serious?

  • Paromita Vohra: The numbers game

    Paromita Vohra: The numbers game

    There is something about numbers that is presented as superior. For instance, when you say you like something, there will always be some realist, yaniki cynic, who will snort “that’s all ok, but show me the numbers”

  • Paromita Vohra: Stars and stardust

    Paromita Vohra: Stars and stardust

    Ten years ago, a student at a workshop I conducted at the University of Hyderabad worked on a film about his life experiences.

  • Paromita Vohra: Hey Taxi

    Paromita Vohra: Hey Taxi

    One of the great pleasures of living and working in Bombay is that you can hail a cab or auto anywhere, anytime. I’ve drunk deep of this pleasure, never feeling the need to get a car when I can get a cab. Lately though, I’ve fallen out of the habit of hailing a cab and into the habit of pressing on an app button.

  • Paromita Vohra: Oh, dear!

    Paromita Vohra: Oh, dear!

    Remember the days when letters used to begin with Dear? No? Actually neither do I.

  • Paromita Vohra: Commuting in beauty

    Paromita Vohra: Commuting in beauty

    The last few months have taken me travelling around, and running up and down airport corridors has become my token exercise

  • Paromita Vohra Column: Division of labour

    Paromita Vohra Column: Division of labour

    In 1995, I made a documentary about a credit co-operative called Annapurna. It had been founded in 1975 by a group of women including Prema Purao, Savitri bai and Parvati bai.

  • Paromita Vohra Column: Remember Parineeti Chopra?

    Paromita Vohra Column: Remember Parineeti Chopra?

    How we enjoyed her sassy, little-bit-loud Ladies vs Ricky Bahl in an otherwise limp film; her mixture of feistiness and intensity in Ishaqzaade; her unwavering gaze with the slight shimmer of vulnerability in Shudh Desi Romance

  • Paromita Vohra Column: How to be good

    Paromita Vohra Column: How to be good

    Most of us want to be good. Or believe we are basically good people. A lot of our time, especially in social analysis, when stripped of its varied intellectual dresses, is spent assessing the goodness of people and institutions — politicians, movie stars, businesses