Young women can 'bank' exercise for better heart health later: Study

18 September,2023 11:27 AM IST |  Sydney  |  IANS

That`s compared to around 78 bpm for the women who`d been the least active from their 20s to 40s

Representational Image. Pic Courtesy/iStock


Your browser doesn’t support HTML5 audio

Women can retain the benefits of exercise during their 20s, going on to have better heart health later in life, according to a new study.

Researchers from The University of Queensland in Australia analysed longitudinal data from 479 women who reported their physical activity levels every three years from their early 20s to their mid-40s.

"We wanted to explore whether women could 'grow' their physical activity, like bank savings, for enhanced cardiovascular health," said Dr Gregore Iven Mielke from UQ's School of Public Health.

"It appears they can," he said.

The study, published in the Journal of Physical Activity and Health, showed women in their 40s who'd been the most active in young adulthood had a resting heart rate, on average, of around 72 beats per minute (bpm).

That's compared to around 78 bpm for the women who'd been the least active from their 20s to 40s.

Mielke said while the difference may seem small, previous studies suggested an increase in resting heart rate of even 1 bpm was associated with increased mortality.

"A lower resting heart rate usually means your heart is working more efficiently and as it should be," he said.

"These findings suggest that regular physical activity, irrespective of timing, appears to provide cardiovascular health benefits for women before the transition to menopause. It shows us that public health initiatives should be promoting an active lifestyle for women in their 20s and 30s, with the positive health impact still being evident later in life."

The researchers said knowing more about the potential effects of accumulating physical activity was important.

"Especially for women, as pregnancy and childbearing drastically impact on levels of physical activity," Mielke said.

"Few other studies have used life course epidemiology models to explore the extent to which accumulating physical activity throughout life is important for preventing diseases."

This story has been sourced from a third party syndicated feed, agencies. Mid-day accepts no responsibility or liability for its dependability, trustworthiness, reliability and data of the text. Mid-day management/mid-day.com reserves the sole right to alter, delete or remove (without notice) the content in its absolute discretion for any reason whatsoever

"Exciting news! Mid-day is now on WhatsApp Channels Subscribe today by clicking the link and stay updated with the latest news!" Click here!
health life and style Lifestyle news lifestyle Health And Wellness Hello Health
Related Stories