Malaal Movie Review: Old-school romance with a dash of newness

Updated: Jul 05, 2019, 22:18 IST | Gayatri Nirmal

Meezaan's physique and hair will constantly remind you of a younger Sanjay Dutt from Khalnayak. Sharmin Segal is a cute-looking girl with a unique voice, who is good in parts where she has to emote through her eyes.

Malaal Movie Review: Old-school romance with a dash of newness
Meezaan and Sharmin Segal in a still from the film. Picture Courtesy: YouTube

Malaal
U/A: Drama/Romance 
Director: Mangesh Hadawale
Cast: Meezaan Jaffrey, Sharmin Segal
Ratings: Rating

For those, who are unaware of the Hindi word 'Malaal' – it means 'Regret'. The film marks the debut vehicle for actor Jaaved Jaaferi's son, Meezaan, and Sanjay Leela Bhansali's niece, Sharmin Segal. Both these Bhansali proteges assisted him in his film, Padmaavat, and therefore the excitement around these debutants is quite big. We liked how the maverick filmmaker Sanjay Leela Bhansali and Jaaved Jaaferi refrained from promoting Meezaan and Sharmin, unlike a few others.

Let's come back to what Malaal is all about. It's about a boy with a rugged look, who is stubborn and has messy long hair. His name is Shiva More (Meezaan) who is the hero of his chawl and is known for his not-so-healthy habits and rowdy behaviour. His dysfunctional relationship with his father is the talk of the town, because of which Shiva has got a bad rep in his vicinity. Set against the backdrop of old South Bombay (1998), Shiva lives in 'Amba Vadi Chawl' and fate brings Astha Tripathi (Sharmin) and her family to the same chawl as Shiva, which is dominated by Maharashtrians.

Malaal
Meezaan Jaffery and Sharmin Segal. Picture Courtesy: Instagram/meezanj

Initially, Astha's poise and Shiva's undisciplined persona acts as the obstacle between them but somewhere, these are the same factors that bring them closer. Their love story also slightly brushes upon the state leader, who wants to divide and rule by asking Shiva and other local goons to shoo away North Indians entering the city. The tides change when Shiva falls for Astha (North Indian) and chants 'Hum Sab Indians Hain' (We are all Indians). Their love story continues like the usual one, which you must have seen in several other romantic films in Bollywood. The girl acts as a primary school teacher for the back-bencher boyfriend, Shiva. Well, the end is definitely heart-touching and will give you a deja-vu of a 2018 romance-drama.

Also Read: Meezaan admits being in a relationship but not with Navya Naveli Nanda

Talking about their performances, Meezaan's physique and hair will constantly remind you of a younger Sanjay Dutt from Khalnayak. His acting chops, dialogue delivery are decent but the lad has got to brush up on his dance skills. Sharmin Segal is a cute-looking girl with a unique voice, who is good in parts where she has to emote through her eyes but otherwise, her expressions looked similar in most scenes. Considering that the film has been produced by Sanjay Leela Bhansali, who has given us some larger-than-life films, one can see a minuscule glimpse of his expertise in Malaal in a Ganpati dance sequence, where the chawl's women are seen shaking their leg in a folk dance. Dialogues are rustic that you often get to hear by Mumbaikars. It's an out and out love story and relatable in many places. Malaal has been helmed by Marathi film, Tingya's director, Mangesh Hadawale.

Can certainly give it a watch!

Watch the trailer  of Malaal here:

Also Read: Priyanka Chopra on Sharmin Segal: Sincerity will help her grow

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